May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Modulation of Oxidative Sress in Human Retinal Cells Using Natural Polyphenols in Myrtle
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Dutot
    Toxicology, Faculte de Pharmacie Paris 5, Paris, France
  • L. Rambaux
    Toxicology, Faculte de Pharmacie Paris 5, Paris, France
  • J.-M. Warnet
    Toxicology, Faculte de Pharmacie Paris 5, Paris, France
    Centre Hospitalier National d’Ophtalmologie des XV-XX, Paris, France
  • P. Rat
    Toxicology, Faculte de Pharmacie Paris 5, Paris, France
    Centre Hospitalier National d’Ophtalmologie des XV-XX, Paris, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Dutot, None; L. Rambaux, None; J. Warnet, None; P. Rat, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5940. doi:https://doi.org/
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      M. Dutot, L. Rambaux, J.-M. Warnet, P. Rat; Modulation of Oxidative Sress in Human Retinal Cells Using Natural Polyphenols in Myrtle. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5940. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Retina is located in a highly oxygenated environment and is then particularly susceptible to oxidative damage. Myrtle possesses nutritional properties and a high antioxidant potential since it is rich in anthocyans. The Aim of this work was to study the cytoprotective role of myrtle on human retinal cells.

Methods: : Myrtle was incubated at 0.05% and 0.1% for 15minutes or 24hours on a retinal human cell line. Then, oxidative stress was induced by 150µM tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) for 1hour. Intracellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species, superoxide anion and mitochondrial apoptosis were evaluated using Alamar blue, DCFDA, dihydroethidium and nonylacridine orange dyes. Tests were performed using cytofluorometry adapted to microplates.

Results: : Myrtle protected cells against tBHP-induced cytotoxicity. It increased cell viability (+30%), decreased oxidative stress (-15%) and mitochondrial apoptosis (-21%). After a 24-hour preincubation time, myrtle totally inhibited tBHP-induced cytotoxicity.

Conclusions: : Myrtle seems to be a potent antioxidant and could be easily added in food complements to prevent or limit ocular pathologies induced by oxidative stress.

Keywords: oxidation/oxidative or free radical damage • antioxidants • retinal pigment epithelium 
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