May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Comparative (Contact vs. Noncontact) Evaluation of Utility of Optiflex Assistant System in Wide Angle Panoramic Vitreoretinal Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. K. Gupta
    Ophthalmology, Univ of Florida-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida
  • V. S. Brar
    Ophthalmology, Univ of Florida-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida
  • K. Chalam
    Ophthalmology, Univ of Florida-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.K. Gupta, None; V.S. Brar, None; K. Chalam, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5959. doi:https://doi.org/
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      S. K. Gupta, V. S. Brar, K. Chalam; Comparative (Contact vs. Noncontact) Evaluation of Utility of Optiflex Assistant System in Wide Angle Panoramic Vitreoretinal Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5959. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Wide angle viewing system usage in pars plana vitrectomy has shortened the duration of surgery and enhanced the surgical success rate of complicated retinal detachment surgeries. However, an assistant is needed during the course of surgery to stabilize the lens on the cornea. We evaluated OptiFlex, a touch based new instrument (VOLK) which can be used as a surgical assistant during vitreoretinal surgeries utilizing both contact as well as non contact wide angle viewing systems .

Methods: : OptiFlex system is an accessory which can be used with all leading surgical microscopes. It utilizes a tension control unit and a flexible arm assembly which allows positioning of non contact and contact surgical lenses during vitreoretinal surgeries.The ophthalmic surgical lens is mounted to the flexible arm. When tension is applied through the power source the flexible arm locks into position stabilizing the lens over the cornea. The system is both motion sensitive or foot pedal operated and the surgeon can precisely adjust the position and orientation of the lens with out the need of a surgical assistant. Rate of intraoperative adjustment was measured.

Results: : The new OptiFlex system was used in over 100 cases (62 contact lens vs 38 noncontact lens) to stabilize the wide angle contact lenses on the cornea and gives a clear view during retinal surgeries. This frees the surgeon or assistant from the task of supporting lenses during the course of surgery. It was equally useful in both systems. Rate of intraoperative adjustment was significantly lower in noncontact lens usage (1.8 times) compared to (3.6times) in contact lens usage. (p<0.05)

Conclusions: : OptiFlex as a surgical assistant is a promising tool during retinal surgeries. It makes the surgeon independent and accelerates the surgical procedure without compromising the clarity, field of view, and magnification of the retina. Rate of required intraoperative adjustment is much lower in noncontact lens system usage.

Keywords: vitreoretinal surgery • retina • vitreous 
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