May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Improvement in Visual Quality of Life After Traditional and Microincisional Vitrectomy Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G. J. Burrell
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • S. M. Hariprasad
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • W. F. Mieler
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • R. D. Jager
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  G.J. Burrell, None; S.M. Hariprasad, Genentech, R; Pfizer, R; Alcon, R; Novartis, R; Alimera Sciences, R; W.F. Mieler, None; R.D. Jager, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIDDK Grant T35-DK62719-20
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 5970. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      G. J. Burrell, S. M. Hariprasad, W. F. Mieler, R. D. Jager; Improvement in Visual Quality of Life After Traditional and Microincisional Vitrectomy Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):5970. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To compare the effects of 20-, 23-, and 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) on vision-related quality-of-life (VR-QOL) and explore the association between self-reported visual quality-of-life and objective measures of visual function.

Methods: : Thirty-one eyes (of 31 patients) were prospectively chosen to undergo 20-gauge, 23-gauge, or 25-gauge vitrectomy. The National Eye Institute’s 25-Item Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) was administered to all study patients pre-operatively as well as ten days, one month, and four months post-operatively. Multi-item scales rating different aspects of VR-QOL were compared at each interval, and their correlation to objective visual test performance before and after surgery was analyzed.

Results: : Patients in all three surgical groups exhibited similar baseline values, both in terms of VR-QOL and objective visual acuity tests. In the ten-day post-operative period, patients who received microincisional vitrectomy surgery (MIVS, 23- or 25-gauge) exhibited significantly better improvement in the areas of general vision (p=0.038), ocular pain (p=0.043), distance activities (p=0.046), dependency (p=0.029), and overall VR-QOL (p=0.008) than patients who received the traditional 20-gauge procedure. In the one-month post-operative period, patients receiving MIVS exhibited significantly better improvement in the areas of ocular pain (p=0.047) and distance activities (p=0.044) than their traditional vitrectomy counterparts, but did not exhibit significantly better improvement in composite VFQ scores (p=0.269). After four months, the only significant improvement which arose between microincisional and 20-gauge patients was in their ease and comfort with driving (p=0.037).

Conclusions: : In cases where traditional and microincisional vitrectomy are equally plausible, microincisional surgery can offer patients reduced pain, greater independence, and a better subjective perception of their vision in the immediate post-operative period.

Keywords: vitreoretinal surgery • quality of life 
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