May 2008
Volume 49, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2008
Efficacy of Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injection in Primary and Recurrent Pterygia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • O. L. Lee
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • M. R. Banitt
    Ophthalmology, Kellogg Eye Center, Univeristy of Michigan, Michigan
  • J. E. Anderson
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • C. Y. Shih
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • D. C. Ritterband
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  O.L. Lee, None; M.R. Banitt, None; J.E. Anderson, None; C.Y. Shih, None; D.C. Ritterband, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2008, Vol.49, 6029. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      O. L. Lee, M. R. Banitt, J. E. Anderson, C. Y. Shih, D. C. Ritterband; Efficacy of Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injection in Primary and Recurrent Pterygia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2008;49(13):6029. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To report the efficacy of subconjunctival bevacizumab injection in regression of vascularity of primary and recurrent pterygia.

Methods: : This pilot study included 20 eyes of 19 patients that were stratified into two groups. Patients in the treatment group received bevacizumab 1.25mg/0.05ml injected subconjunctivally into the pterygium adjacent to the limbus. Patients in the control group were treated with topical steroids for recurrent pterygia and lubrication for primary pterygia. Slit lamp photos were taken prior to treatment and at two and four weeks intervals after initiation of treatment. Pterygia were evaluated photographically by two independent, blinded cornea specialists and graded on a 0 to 10 scale of increasing vascularity.

Results: : Of the 10 eyes that received bevacizumab injections, 50% (5/10) were graded as having less vascularity, 40% (4/10) were graded as having more vascularity and 10% (1/10) had a stable vascularity score at 2 weeks. By 4 weeks, only 29% (2/7) had a vascularity score lower than their pre-injection level. When compared with the control group, there was no statistical difference in change of vascularity noted at both 2 and 4 weeks after initiation of treatment. No relevant adverse side effects were observed in our series.

Conclusions: : Subconjunctival injection of bevacizumab may represent a treatment alternative for patients with pterygia who wish to avoid surgery. Initial results show that single injections at a concentration of 1.25mg/0.05ml result in mild transient improvement in vascularity at two weeks. However, by four weeks, there may be worsening of vascularity suggesting that repeat bevacizumab injections may be needed to provide a lasting effect.

Keywords: pterygium • cornea: clinical science • vascular endothelial growth factor 
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