May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Refractive Surgery Among Israel Defense Forces Recruits
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Horowitz
    Medical Services Center, Medical Corps, Israel Defense Forces, Haifa, Israel
    Ophthalmology,
    Ophthalmology, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
  • E. Mezer
    Ophthalmology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
  • T. Shochat Tzippora
    Medical Services Center, Medical Corps, Israel Defense Forces, Haifa, Israel
    statistics,
  • G. Buckman
    Ophthalmology, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
  • O. Geyer
    Ophthalmology, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships J. Horowitz, None; E. Mezer, None; T. Shochat Tzippora, None; G. Buckman, None; O. Geyer, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1001. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      J. Horowitz, E. Mezer, T. Shochat Tzippora, G. Buckman, O. Geyer; Refractive Surgery Among Israel Defense Forces Recruits. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1001. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose:: To determine the prevalence of refractive surgery among recruits for military service in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) between 1998-2005, and to check its effect on their fitness to serve in combat units.

Methods:: This retrospective non-randomized clinical trial compared all recruits who wore corrective eyewear with those who had undergone laser refractive surgery prior to induction. The prevalence of refractive surgery among all ametropic inductees was calculated, and assignment to combat units of operated recruits was compared to that of corrective eyewear users. Perseverance in these units was calculated by checking the last military position of each recruit.

Results:: A total of 597 inductees (513 males and 84 females) underwent refractive surgery prior to their military service during the study period. The prevalence of operated recruits increased from 0.8/1000 ametropes in 1998 to 4.9/1000 ametropes in 2005. Significantly more operated recruits were assigned to combat units: 73.5% compared to 51.3% corrective eyewear users, p<0.0001. The dropout rate from combat units of the former was significantly lower than that of the latter: 13.1% versus 29.2%, respectively, p<0.0001.

Conclusions:: Rising numbers of corrective eyewear users currently undergo refractive surgery prior to their IDF military service and relatively more of them apply for combat duty. The very high percentage of operated soldiers who serve uninterruptedly in combat units indicates that this procedure causes no restriction in their performance of duty.

Keywords: refractive surgery • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: natural history • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×