May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
The Removal of 10/0 Polyester (Mersilene) Sutures After Small Incision Congenital Cataract Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. M. Bar-Sela
    Ophthal-Goldschleger Eye Inst, Tel-Aviv University, Jerusalem, Israel
  • O. Spierer
    Ophthal-Goldschleger Eye Inst, Tel-Aviv University, Jerusalem, Israel
  • A. Spierer
    Ophthal-Goldschleger Eye Inst, Tel-Aviv University, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships S.M. Bar-Sela, None; O. Spierer, None; A. Spierer, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1083. doi:https://doi.org/
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      S. M. Bar-Sela, O. Spierer, A. Spierer; The Removal of 10/0 Polyester (Mersilene) Sutures After Small Incision Congenital Cataract Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1083. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To evaluate the functioning of a 10/0 polyester (Mersilene) sutures for small corneal incision congenital cataract surgery.

Methods:: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 55 cases (39 patients), aged 2 months to 12 years, who underwent congenital cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation between 1999 and 2004, using Mersilene sutures. An examination looking for suture-related complications and retionoscopy was done 1 week after surgery and then every month for 6 months. The sutures were removed in cases of local tissue reaction, but not due to high postoperative astigmatism. Paired t-test was used to compare patients’ age and astigmatism level in those cases which had suture removal (group1) as opposed to those who did not (group 2).

Results:: In 10 cases (18%) corneal vascularization, necessitating suture removal, was found during 6-month follow-up period, without the trigger of loose suture. patients’ age was 3.5 ± 3.3 years and 4.2 ± 3.1 years in groups 1 and 2, respectively. At 1 week postoperatively the astigmatism value was 1.7 ± 1.7 Diopter (D) and 2.4 ± 2.2 D in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and it reduced to 0.9 ± 0.8, in both groups at 6 months postoperatively. One case of endophthalmitis was encountered 2 days after suture removal.

Conclusions:: Removal of Mersilene sutures after congenital cataract surgery is required in cases of corneal vascularization, occurring during the first months postoperatively. Owing to the risk of general anesthesia and infection, suture removal should be considered with caution in cases of postoperative astigmatism.

Keywords: cataract • small incision cataract surgery 
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