May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Electronic Recording of Patching for Amblyopia Group (ERPAG): Final Visual Acuity of the Study Population in the Hague
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. E. Loudon
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Ophthalmology,
  • M. Fronius
    Ophthalmology, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • B. Simonsz
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Public Health,
  • C. W. N. Looman
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Public Health,
  • H. J. Simonsz
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Ophthalmology,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships S.E. Loudon, None; M. Fronius, None; B. Simonsz, None; C.W.N. Looman, None; H.J. Simonsz, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support Health Research and Development Council of the Netherlands; M. Fronius: Albert von Metzler Foundation, Augenstern Association, Research Award of the German Society of Ophthalmology (DOG), Germany
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1107. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S. E. Loudon, M. Fronius, B. Simonsz, C. W. N. Looman, H. J. Simonsz; Electronic Recording of Patching for Amblyopia Group (ERPAG): Final Visual Acuity of the Study Population in the Hague. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1107. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To evaluate the final visual outcome of the children in the ERPAG study group who were treated with occlusion therapy for amblyopia.

 
Methods:
 

From July 2001 until December 2003, 303 newly diagnosed amblyopic children in The Hague were registered. Compliance was measured with the Occlusion Dose Monitor (ODM), 1 week every 3 months. All children received standard orthoptic care by the treating orthoptist. Visual acuity was assessed in children whose occlusion treatment was either ‘completed’ by the orthoptists or ‘terminated’ by the parents, and in children who had reached the age of six, using standard protocols. The independent research orthoptist tested the best corrected visual acuity using Landolt-C chart 17.2’ and 2.6’ inter-optotype distance.

 
Results:
 

In 203 (67%) children the final visual acuity in the amblyopic eye was assessed. Mean time interval between the end of treatment and the assessment of acuity in a standardized fashion was 5 months. Overall, mean acuity at treatment onset was 0.29 ± 0.59 logMAR; at re-assessment acuity was 0.20 ± 0.59 logMAR. Mean acuity in the amblyopic eye of children who were not occluded at all was 0.25 ± 0.55 logMAR. Figure 1 shows the relationship between acuity in the amblyopic eye and the level of compliance. There was no significant difference in mean acuity at treatment onset and mean age of the children for the 4 compliance categories (P=0.228; P=0.327, respectively).

 
Conclusions:
 

Despite low compliance, visual acuity in the amblyopic eye improved.  

 
Clinical Trial:
 

www.clinicaltrials.gov ISRCTN54685764

 
Keywords: amblyopia • visual acuity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×