May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Inhibition of Cathepsin L Causes a Reduced Neovascularization in the Retina and Choroid
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • N. Shimada
    Tokyo Medical & Dental Univ, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • K. Ohno-Matsui
    Tokyo Medical & Dental Univ, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • A. Kojima
    Tokyo Medical & Dental Univ, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • M. Mochizuki
    Tokyo Medical & Dental Univ, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science,
  • I. Morita
    Tokyo Medical & Dental Univ, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships N. Shimada, None; K. Ohno-Matsui, None; A. Kojima, None; M. Mochizuki, None; I. Morita, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1753. doi:https://doi.org/
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      N. Shimada, K. Ohno-Matsui, A. Kojima, M. Mochizuki, I. Morita; Inhibition of Cathepsin L Causes a Reduced Neovascularization in the Retina and Choroid. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1753. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: Recent studies have demonstrated that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were recruited to the retina and contributed to the retinal and choroidal neovascularization in a murine model. Interestingly, it has also been shown that the protease cathepsin L has a critical role for EPC-mediated neovascularization (C Urbich, Nat Med 2004). To offer a novel therapeutic strategy targeting EPCs, we examined whether retinal and choroidal neovasucularization were decreased by inhibition of cathepsin L.

Methods:: Mice with oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy (OIR) or with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) received periocular injection of cathepsin L inhibitor or vehicle only. Mice with OIR were sacrificed at P17 and mice with CNV were sacrificed 2 weeks after laser irradiation. Serial sections were made from the eyeball and the area of neovascularization was analyzed using image analysis software.

Results:: In OIR, mice treated with 400 µM or 40 µM cathepsin L inhibitor had significantly less retinal neovascularization than did vehicle-treated mice (49.6% and 26.0% of vehicle-treated mice (P<0.01)). In CNV model, mice treated with 400 µM or 40 µM cathepsin L inhibitor also had significantly less CNV than did vehicle-treated mice (40.8% and 21.1% of vehicle-treated mice (P<0.01)).

Conclusions:: Inhibition of cathepsin L causes a reduced neovascularization in OIR and CNV model. The results suggest that cathepsin L plays a critical role in the development of retinal and choroidal neovascularization, and cathepsin L might be a novel therapeutic target for intraocular pathological neovascularization.

Keywords: neovascularization • retinal neovascularization • choroid: neovascularization 
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