May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Biological Activity of Collagen Type I to Surfaced-Modified Hydrogels
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. Zheng
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Ophthalmology,
  • D. Myung
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Ophthalmology,
    Chemical Engineering,
  • A. Bakri
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Ophthalmology,
  • J. Noolandi
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Ophthalmology,
  • J. Cochran
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Bioengineering,
  • C. Frank
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Chemical Engineering,
  • C. Ta
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Ophthalmology,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships L. Zheng, None; D. Myung, Stanford University, P; A. Bakri, None; J. Noolandi, Stanford University, P; J. Cochran, None; C. Frank, Stanford University, P; C. Ta, Stanford University, P.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1866. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      L. Zheng, D. Myung, A. Bakri, J. Noolandi, J. Cochran, C. Frank, C. Ta; Biological Activity of Collagen Type I to Surfaced-Modified Hydrogels. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1866. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: This study examined the capacity of a surface-modified poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PEG/PAA) hydrogel, designed to serve as a artificial cornea, to sustain biologically active collagen type I, which promotes surface corneal epithelialization.

Methods:: PEG/PAA hydrogel surfaces were modified with varying densities of collagen type I through a photoreactive, bifunctional azide-active-ester linker. The bioactivity of the collagen tethered to the hydrogels was quantified using a conformation-specific antibody in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The absorbances were compared to a standard curve of collagen adsorbed at varying concentrations to MaxiSorp polystyrene. Heat-denatured collagen was adsorbed to MaxiSorp polystyrene as a negative control.

Results:: Reactivity to bioactive collagen type I increased as a function of collagen reacted to the surface. A comparable trend was demonstrated by collagen adsorbed to the Maxisorp surfaces. Heat-denatured collagen did not produce a signal, indicating that the conformation-specific antibody could not detect inactive collagen.

Conclusions:: One of the challenges in designing a polymer that supports surface covalent immobilization of proteins is surface-induced denaturation. These results, however, indicate that proteins remain in their native conformation when tethered to the PEG/PAA hydrogel surface. Therefore, this material can be used to tether proteins, such as collagen type I, to enhance epithelial cell growth and adhesion.

Keywords: keratoprostheses • cornea: epithelium • cornea: stroma and keratocytes 
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