May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
TPS - A Potential Blood Marker for Detecting Metastatic Uveal Melanoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • V. Barak
    Immunology Lab for Tumor Diagnosis, Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Jerusalem, Israel
  • S. Frenkel
    Department of Ophthalmology,
    Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • I. Kalickman
    Immunology Lab for Tumor Diagnosis,
    Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • K. Hendler
    Department of Ophthalmology,
    Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • R. Folberg
    Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • J. Pe'er
    Department of Ophthalmology,
    Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships V. Barak, None; S. Frenkel, None; I. Kalickman, None; K. Hendler, None; R. Folberg, None; J. Pe'er, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support NIH Grant EY10457
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1947. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      V. Barak, S. Frenkel, I. Kalickman, K. Hendler, R. Folberg, J. Pe'er; TPS - A Potential Blood Marker for Detecting Metastatic Uveal Melanoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1947. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To evaluate the possible role of the level of serum TPS (tissue polypeptide specific antigen, a cytokeratin 18 fragment), previously shown to be over-expressed in metastatic uveal melanoma, in differentiating between uveal melanoma patients with and without metastases.

Methods:: The study included three groups of patients: 64 uveal melanoma patients who remained disease-free (DF) for at least 10 years; 37 patients with liver metastases of uveal melanoma, in 20 of whom we had documented pre- and post-metastasis levels; and 53 controls without a history of any malignant disease. Serum levels of TPS (µ/L) were detected by ELISA (IDL, Sweden). Statistical analysis included t-test, sign test (non-parametric), ANOVA, and ROC analysis. The TPS analysis was compared to markers we have studied previously: Osteopontin (OPN), MIA, and S-100ß.

Results:: The study demonstrated a statistically significant difference between TPS levels in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma (139.63 + 22.20), DF patients (69.29 + 9.76), and controls (54.23 + 0.01), p < 0.0001. Significant differences were found between the levels of TPS in the pre-and post-metastatic stage, p < 0.01. ROC analysis of the metastatic group vs. DF patients revealed AUC for TPS alone - 71%; for TPS and OPN - 82%; for TPS, OPN AND S-100 - 84%; and for the combination of all four markers - 86%.

Conclusions:: Serum TPS, like OPN, MIA and S-100ß levels, distinguishes well between metastatic and DF patients or controls, and therefore may serve as a marker for early detection of metastases in patients with uveal melanoma.

Keywords: melanoma • tumors • oncology 
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