May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
En Face Snapshot Spectral Imaging of the Retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G. Muyo
    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • A. Gorman
    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • I. Al Abboud
    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • D. J. Mordant
    Ophthalmology Unit, Cheltenham General Hospital, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
  • A. I. McNaught
    Ophthalmology Unit, Cheltenham General Hospital, Cheltenham, United Kingdom
  • A. R. Harvey
    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2582. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      G. Muyo, A. Gorman, I. Al Abboud, D. J. Mordant, A. I. McNaught, A. R. Harvey; En Face Snapshot Spectral Imaging of the Retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2582.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: There is increasing interest in the application of spectral imaging for biochemical functional mapping of the retina. The solution to recording the required three-dimensional data cube using a two-dimensional detector array is normally to record images in time sequence in a way that scans one of the cube dimensions; typically either a sequence of narrow-band images are recorded and subsequently coregistered or a hyperspectral line image is scanned across the retina. In both cases the time sequential nature is undesirable: the increased time required to record the data combined with the infirmity that is common of patients with eye disease is problematic - both for the patient and in the impact on image quality; spectral calibration and image coregistration can be highly problematic and it is not possible to record en face time-resolved spectral images. Unfortunately a putative two-dimensional spectral camera; the spectral imaging equivalent of conventional RGB colour camera has been notable by its absence. We report here on the development of a new snapshot spectral retinal camera and its first use for blood oximetry.

Methods:: The key component of this unique retinal camera is a novel image replicating imaging spectrometer (IRIS) that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism polarising beam splitters to simultaneously replicate images of the retina in multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. In principle the technique is 100% optically efficient enabling the intensity of light at the retina to be minimised. An IRIS system has been integrated into a conventional fundus camera by simply locating its input object plane so as to intercept the output image plane of the fundus camera.

Results:: Eight bands in the range of 580-600 nm are recorded in a single snapshot and spectral processing yields a map of retinal blood oxygenation in real time. The results of early clinical trials will be reported.

Conclusions:: A new spectral imaging instrument suitable for clinical applications allows performing oxygen saturation measurements in the retina by erradicating calibration and misregistration problems associated with time-sequential techniques.

Keywords: imaging/image analysis: clinical • hypoxia • retina 
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