May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Effect of Grade I and II Intraventricular Hemorrhage on Visuocortical Functioning
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • W. V. Good
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Res Inst, San Francisco, California
  • C. Hou
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Res Inst, San Francisco, California
  • A. M. Norcia
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Res Inst, San Francisco, California
  • M. W. Pettet
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Res Inst, San Francisco, California
  • A. Madan
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships W.V. Good, None; C. Hou, None; A.M. Norcia, None; M.W. Pettet, None; A. Madan, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support WVG R01 EY015228 HIGHWIRE EXLINK_ID="48:5:3169:1" VALUE="EY015228" TYPEGUESS="GEN" /HIGHWIRE
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 3169. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      W. V. Good, C. Hou, A. M. Norcia, M. W. Pettet, A. Madan; Effect of Grade I and II Intraventricular Hemorrhage on Visuocortical Functioning. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):3169. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: Grade III/IV intraventricular hemorrhage is a major cause of adverse neurological outcome. However, the effect of milder hemorrhage (grade I/II) IVH on neurological outcome is less clearly defined. Here we measured Sweep Visual Evoked Potential (SVEP) responses to determine if infants with grade I or II IVH, as detected by head ultrasound, had visual function changes compared to age-matched infants with normal head ultrasounds.

Methods:: A total of 72 very low birthweight (<1500g) infants were examined, either with grade I or II IVH (n=20) or without IVH (n=52) as detected by head ultrasound. SVEP exams were conducted between 5 and 7 month corrected age. The two groups were similar for gestational age, birthweight, and post-conceptional age at the time of examination. Infants with any > Stage II ROP or Plus disease were excluded. Contrast sensitivity, grating acuity, and vernier acuity were measured using swept-parameter visual evoked potentials. Thresholds and response amplitudes across swept-parameters in two groups were compared.

Results:: Grade I or II IVH infants showed higher (worse) individual-averaged vernier thresholds than control infants (1.01 IVH vs 0.58 arcmin, p<0.001), while contrast and grating thresholds showed no difference. SVEP response amplitudes to swept contrast, spatial frequency and vernier-offset stimuli were significantly lower in infants with grade I or II IVH than in infants with no IVH.

Conclusions:: SVEP response amplitudes to a wide range of contrast, spatial frequency and vernier offset values are decreased in infants with grade I or II IVH compared to controls and vernier offset thresholds are elevated. These physiological changes indicate that milder germinal matrix hemorrhages (grade I/II IVH) are associated with functional deficits when measured at 5-7 months corrected age. Longterm deleterious effects of Grade I and II IVH on vision or development are unknown, and are under investigation.

Keywords: neuro-ophthalmology: cortical function/rehabilitation • visual cortex • electrophysiology: clinical 
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