May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Anophthalmic Socket in Patients With Chronic Ocular Prosthesis Use
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Nguyen
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
  • A. Husain
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
  • B. Esmaeli
    Section of Ophthalmology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships J. Nguyen, None; A. Husain, None; B. Esmaeli, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 3595. doi:https://doi.org/
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      J. Nguyen, A. Husain, B. Esmaeli; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Anophthalmic Socket in Patients With Chronic Ocular Prosthesis Use. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):3595. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) is a very uncommon cancer in the anophthalmic socket. We report 2 patients in whom SCCA developed in their anophthalmic socket more than 44 years after enucleation and chronic use of an ocular prosthesis.

Methods:: The clinical records, histopathologic sections, and the surgical records in each case were reviewed.

Results:: There was no history of cigarette smoking, or exposure to HIV or HPV. The presenting symptoms included new onset of discharge and a poor fitting prosthesis. Both patients had invasive SCCA of the anophthalmic socket with primary involvement of the bulbar conjunctiva confirmed via a biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated extension of tumor into the deep orbital tissues. In each case the eyelid skin and palpebral conjunctiva were not involved. The systemic metastatic work-up including ultrasonography of the regional lymph nodes were negative. Both patients underwent an orbital exenteration after the diagnosis of invasive conjunctival SCCA was established.

Conclusions:: In these 2 patients with anophthalmic socket and full-time prosthesis wear for over 40 years, chronic irritation and contact with the ocular prosthesis may be a putative risk factor for development of conjunctival SCCA. Regular examination of the anophthalmic socket in chronic prosthesis users is prudent to detect conjunctival SCCA at the earliest possible stage.

Keywords: tumors • conjunctiva • orbit 
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