May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
IL-10 Inhibits Neovascularization in the ROP Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. S. Solomon
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • J. C. Blanks
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • C. J. Dougherty
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • E. E. Greene
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • R. Tao
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • C. K. Dorey
    College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships E.S. Solomon, None; J.C. Blanks, None; C.J. Dougherty, None; E.E. Greene, None; R. Tao, None; C.K. Dorey, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support NIH Grant EYO16119 HIGHWIRE EXLINK_ID="48:5:4056:1" VALUE="EYO16119" TYPEGUESS="GENPEPT" /HIGHWIRE , ROPARD Foundation, FAU Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 4056. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      E. S. Solomon, J. C. Blanks, C. J. Dougherty, E. E. Greene, R. Tao, C. K. Dorey; IL-10 Inhibits Neovascularization in the ROP Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):4056. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

IL-10 is essential for induction of immune privilege by antigens injected into the aqueous or vitreous. IL-10 is reported to inhibit angiogenesis induced by tumors and limb ischemia. We hypothesized that induction of IL-10 contributes to the antiangiogenic effects of intravitreally administered peptides and proteins.

 
Methods:
 

Neonatal mice raised in 75% oxygen from day 7 to day 12, were given an intravitreal injection of IL-10 (1 µl of 10µg /ml) on day 12, and maintained in room air for 5 more days. Fixed eyes were cryosectioned, and every 10th section was stained with fluorescein-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia lectin, and sequential contiguous photographs were made of each section. Morphometric analysis of retinal vascular density and area of neovascularization (NV) was performed using Metamorph.

 
Results:
 

The area of NV in IL-10 treated eyes was 924 ± 859, 80% lower than the NV area (4504 ± 1692) in contralateral untreated eyes (P<0.00004; see graph). IL-10 acted selectively on NV: it had no effect on the either the area of intraretinal blood vessels, or the percent of inner nuclear area occupied by blood vessels (P>0.5 for each). To further consider whether IL-10 acted selectively, the fraction of the total vascular area that was NV (%NV) was analyzed in each eye. IL-10 substantially reduced the %NV from 8.3 % in untreated eyes to 2.8%; P<0.006).

 
Conclusions:
 

The potent inhibition produced by 10 ng of IL-10 -- and its half life of 2-4 hours in vivo -- indicate that the early period of retinal hypoxia may be a critical therapeutic window for prevention of neovascularization. These data raise the further possibility that endogenous production of IL-10 contributes to the antiangiogenic effect of intravitreally administered proteins. These results demonstrate that IL-10 is potent inhibitor of intravitreal, hypoxia-induced NV.  

 
Keywords: neovascularization • inflammation • retinal neovascularization 
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