May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Modulation of SLT Response in Patients With Diabetes – Six Month Follow–up of the University of Chicago SLT Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E.H. Leung
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • M.P. Rubin
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • S. Lafayette
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • M. Feitl
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  E.H. Leung, None; M.P. Rubin, None; S. Lafayette, None; M. Feitl, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 120. doi:
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      E.H. Leung, M.P. Rubin, S. Lafayette, M. Feitl; Modulation of SLT Response in Patients With Diabetes – Six Month Follow–up of the University of Chicago SLT Study . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):120.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: SLT is a q–switched, melanosome specific laser used to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) in open angle glaucoma (OAG). A large sector of patients at The University of Chicago Hospitals (UCH), and nationwide, have both diabetes and OAG. Our prior study suggested that diabetic patients may show less response to SLT treatment one month post–operatively. The purpose of this study is to assess the change in IOP following SLT in diabetics versus non–diabetics after long term (6 month) follow up. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of 95 consecutive eyes with open angle glaucoma, who had SLT performed at UCH. In addition to attaining preoperative IOP on the day of surgery, three IOP measurements were attained prior to the date of surgery to ensure that a representative baseline IOP was achieved. One month and six month post–operative pressure was measured and recorded for each eye. Primary outcome evaluated was change in IOP from pretreatment baseline. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed, and statistical significance was established. Results: SLT treatment was performed on 92 eyes with an average preoperative IOP of 19.26 +/– 3.4 mmHg, one month follow up IOP of 17.97+/– 4.34 mmHg (a 1.30 +/– 3.93 mmHg or 6.7% drop), and six month follow up IOP 17.58 +/– 5.24 mmHg (a 1.67 +/– 4.16 mmHg or 8.7% drop.) For patients with diabetes, SLT treatment was performed on 28 eyes with an average preoperative IOP of 18.88 +/– 2.86 mmHg, one month follow up IOP of 18.50+/– 4.31 mmHg (a 0.38 +/– 4.31 mmHg or 2.0% drop), and six month follow up IOP 17.04 +/– 4.07 mmHg (a 1.85 +/– 2.73 mmHg or 9.8% drop.) For patients without diabetes, SLT treatment was performed on 64 eyes with an average preoperative IOP of 19.43 +/– 3.63 mmHg, one month follow up IOP of 17.71+/– 4.31 mmHg (a 1.72 +/– 3.90 mmHg or 8.9% drop), and six month follow up IOP 17.83 +/– 5.69 mmHg (a 1.60 +/– 4.66 mmHg or 8.2% drop.) Conclusions: There was a minimally more favorable response to SLT in non–diabetics versus diabetics one month after treatment, but during the six month follow up visit, response to SLT was comparable between diabetics and non–diabetics (p<.2) In conclusion, diabetes does not appear to be a modulating factor for long term response to SLT treatment.

Keywords: laser • diabetes • intraocular pressure 
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