May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Retinoic Acid Reduces Horizontal Cell Responsiveness to Light in A NO–Dependant Manner
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • I. Perlman
    Physiology & Biophysics, Technion–Israel Inst of Tech, Haifa, Israel
    Rappaport Institute, Haifa, Israel
  • E. Weiner
    Physiology & Biophysics, Technion–Israel Inst of Tech, Haifa, Israel
    Rappaport Institute, Haifa, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  I. Perlman, None; E. Weiner, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  ISF Grant 259/04
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 597. doi:
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      I. Perlman, E. Weiner; Retinoic Acid Reduces Horizontal Cell Responsiveness to Light in A NO–Dependant Manner . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):597.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Retinoic acid (RA) has been suggested to act as a neuromodulator in the vertebrate retina adjusting retinal function to varying levels of illumination. Since we have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) also serves as background signal, the goal of this project was to test the role of RA and its interactions with NO. Methods: Using intracellular recordings, we recorded photoresponses of L1–horizontal cells (L1–HCs) in the turtle eyecup preparation, while applying RA, NO–related drugs, and combinations of these. Results: Application of exogenous RA in the dark reduced the amplitude of L1–HC photoresponses, similar to the effect of background light. Application of L–arginine (a precursor for NO synthesis) augmented, and application of L–NAME (an inhibitor of NO synthesis) reduced the responsiveness to light of turtle L–HCs. Simultaneous application of RA and L–arginine suppressed the L1–HC responses to a greater extent than did RA alone. Simultaneous application of RA and L–NAME produced lesser response suppression than application of RA alone or of L–NAME alone. Conclusions: These results suggest that RA and NO interact along the visual process leading to the generation of photoresponses in L1–HCs. Our findings are consistent with RA acting as an NO–dependent light–signaling neuromodulator in the turtle horizontal cells.

Keywords: horizontal cells • retinal connections, networks, circuitry • nitric oxide 
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