May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Evaluation of Visual Performance by a Soft Contact Lens With Intentionally Increased Spherical Aberration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Suzaki
    Department of Visual Science,
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Y. Hirohara
    Tech–Research, Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan
  • T. Mihashi
    Tech–Research, Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan
  • N. Maeda
    Department of Ophthalmology,
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • T. Fujikado
    Department of Visual Science,
    Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Suzaki, Menicon Co., Ltd. E; Y. Hirohara, Topcon Corp. E; T. Mihashi, Topcon Corp. E; N. Maeda, None; T. Fujikado, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 691. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A. Suzaki, Y. Hirohara, T. Mihashi, N. Maeda, T. Fujikado; Evaluation of Visual Performance by a Soft Contact Lens With Intentionally Increased Spherical Aberration . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):691.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Patients with large higher–order aberration (HOA), such as keratoconus or cataract, are supposed to have a cortical adaptation process to improve visual performance. However, it is difficult to quantify visual adaptation in patients and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Therefore we produced soft contact lenses (SCLs) intended to increase spherical aberration and tested the optical quality and the visual performance after the application to normal eyes. Methods: We produced five kinds of front aspheric SCLs with increased spherical aberration by changing power from 0.0D to +2.0 D (0.5D step in the area with a radius of 2mm; SCL–a to –e). The power of lens at the geometrical center was set to 0 D. The water content of SCL was 72% (FDA GroupII, non–ionic materials). The subjects included 6 eyes of 3 normal persons. The spherical and cylindrical refractive errors were corrected by glasses over the eye with SCL. Ocular HOA was examined with the Hartmann–Shack sensor (KR–9000PW, Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) for 4 mm diameter, and calculated up to 6th order (RMS error, µm). High– and low–contrast Log MAR acuity (100% and 10% contrast) (SSC–350, Nidek) were measured as subjective parameters. Results: The total HOA was increased with the central aspheric power of the SCLs [SCL–a: 0.14±0.05 µm (mean±SD), b: 0.18±0.03 µm, c: 0.26±0.05 µm, d: 0.33±0.08 µm, e: 0.41±0.11 µm]. The LogMAR acuity decreased with the increase of aspheric power [100% contrast (SCL–a: –0.23±0.10, b: –0.20±0.10, c: –0.16±0.05, d: –0.16±0.12, e: –0.14±0.08), 10% contrast (SCL–a: 0.00±0.08, b: 0.03±0.07, c: 0.12±0.08, d: 0.14±0.12, e: 0.29±0.15)]. Conclusions: In the normal eye with SCL designed to increase the spherical aberration, the HOA increased and log MAR acuity decreased concomitantly with the increase of the central aspheric power of the lens. These observations suggest that the newly developed SCL with intentionally increased spherical aberration may be useful to examine the change of visual performance, such as cortical adaptation, after the increase of HOA.

Keywords: adaptation: blur • contact lens • visual acuity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×