May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Effect of Rotation of Wavefront–Corrected IOLs on the Higher–Order Aberrations of the Eye
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. Wang
    Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • D.D. Koch
    Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  L. Wang, None; D.D. Koch, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 703. doi:
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      L. Wang, D.D. Koch; Effect of Rotation of Wavefront–Corrected IOLs on the Higher–Order Aberrations of the Eye . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):703.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate the theoretical effect of rotation of wavefront–corrected IOLs on 3rd to 6th order higher–order aberrations (HOAs) of the eye. Methods: Using CTView, a wavefront–corrected IOL with HOAs of equal magnitude and opposite sign from the corneal HOAs was created and rotated up to 40 degrees to simulate a rotated IOL. The residual HOAs for 3–, 4–, 5– and 6–mm pupils were calculated by combining the HOAs from the cornea and the rotated IOL. Based on the residual HOAs, optical quality was rated by 3 criteria: 1) the Marechal criterion (MA): a diffraction–limited optical system has aberration less than /14; 2) P10: the lower 10th percentile of the corneal HOAs in this study group; and 3) Decreased HOA (DHOA): residual ocular HOAs have to be less than the corresponding corneal HOAs. Results: Simulated implantation of the wavefront–corrected IOLs was performed in 127 eyes of 89 patients aged 40 to 80 years. For 3–, 4–, 5– and 6–mm pupils, the torsional alignment required to meet the criteria in 95% of eyes were 4.6 degrees, 0.5 degrees, 0.3 degrees and 0.3 degrees for the MA criterion, 7.2 degrees, 8.8 degrees, 10.4 degrees, and 13.3 degrees for the P10 criterion, and 15.7 degrees, 16.5 degrees, 21.3 degrees and 24.0 degrees for the DHOA criterion, respectively. Conclusions: Although excellent torsional alignment is required to meet the MA criterion, the residual HOAs in 95% of eyes were still lower than the corneal HOAs of the best 10% of the studied normal untreated eyes with torsional misalignment up to 7 degrees, indicating that the majority of patients would benefit from the wavefront–correct IOLs.

Keywords: cataract • optical properties • refractive surgery: optical quality 
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