May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Risk Factors for Contact Lens Related Microbial Keratitis in Australia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. Edwards
    Vision CRC, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • L. Keay
    Vision CRC, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • T. Naduvilath
    Vision CRC, Sydney, Australia
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
  • G. Brian
    Vision CRC, Sydney, Australia
  • F. Stapleton
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
  • Microbial Keratitis Study Group
    Vision CRC, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  K. Edwards, None; L. Keay, None; T. Naduvilath, None; G. Brian, None; F. Stapleton, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Australian Government Cooperative Research Centres Grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 926. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      K. Edwards, L. Keay, T. Naduvilath, G. Brian, F. Stapleton, Microbial Keratitis Study Group; Risk Factors for Contact Lens Related Microbial Keratitis in Australia . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):926.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To establish risk factors for and the relative risk of microbial keratitis (MK) for different contact lens (CL) types in Australia. Methods: New cases of CL related presumed MK were identified in a 12 month prospective study. Cases were interviewed by phone to establish risk factor data. Seven hundred CL wearing controls were identified using a population based telephone survey. CL wearers were grouped as follows: daily wear soft CL (including silicone hydrogel and hydrogel) (DWS), soft extended wear CL (EWS), silicone hydrogel extended wear (EWSH), rigid CL daily wear (RGP), and daily disposable CL (DD). The association of independent risk factors with corneal infection was estimated using odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals. Results: 151 cases were reported in the first 6 months with data on CL type and risk factors available in 93 and 70 cases respectively. Males had a higher risk of MK compared to females (OR=1.6, 95% CI=1.01–2.6). The mean age of cases was 33.6±12.8 years, compared with 36.7±12.1 years in controls (p=0.015). Compared to DD wear, the relative risk of MK was 0.2x (95% CI: 0.0–2.4) with RGP, 1.4x (0.4–4.8) with DWS, 24.6x (5.8–103.8) with EWS and 25.5x (7.0–93.1) with EWSH. Behaviours associated with a higher risk of MK included: occasional overnight use of daily wear CL (OR=4.7x, 95% CI=2.1–10.3), not storing CL cases dry (OR=2.4, 95% CI=1.2–5.1), showering in lenses (OR=2.7x, 95% CI=1.2–5.9), smoking (OR=2.5x, 95% CI=1.1–5.5), and inappropriate treatment of CL while swimming (1.3, 95% CI=1.1–1.5). Of the 117 cases where information on final visual outcome was available, there were 7 cases of vision loss of at least 2 lines of best corrected visual acuity: 5 in DWS, 1 in EWS and 1 in EWSH. Conclusions: While the data have yet to be independently reviewed, overnight wear of both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel CLs has a higher risk of MK infection compared to DD, RGP and DWS use. Showering in lenses, smoking, occasional overnight use in DW and inappropriate handling of lenses while swimming are associated with an increased risk of infection.

Keywords: contact lens • keratitis • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×