May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Primary Pterygia Removal With Conjunctival Autograft, Cauterized Punctal Occlusion, and Temporary Tarsorraphy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.R. Hardten
    Ophthalmology, Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis, MN
  • A.M. Fahmy
    Ophthalmology, Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis, MN
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.R. Hardten, None; A.M. Fahmy, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 952. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D.R. Hardten, A.M. Fahmy; Primary Pterygia Removal With Conjunctival Autograft, Cauterized Punctal Occlusion, and Temporary Tarsorraphy . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):952.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To evaluate the clinical outcomes and postoperative symptoms of patients after primary pterygia excision with conjunctival autograft, punctal occlusion, and temporary tarsorrhaphy. Setting Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Methods: In this retrospective study, forty–four eyes with primary pterygia were treated by five physicians using different methods. Variations in treatment plans after excision included use of AmbioDry (OKTO Costa Mesa, California) dehydrated amniotic membrane allograft, conjunctival autograft, punctal occlusion by cautery, temporary tarsorrhaphy, and post operative medical treatment regimen. The mean follow–up period was 6.53 months (range 1–13 months). Results: Mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) results showed significant improvement from 0.65 preoperatively to 0.90 postoperatively. Cases treated with the combination of conjunctival autograft, punctal occlusion by cautery, temporary tarsorrhaphy, and aggressive postoperative lubrication resulted in significant long–term patient comfort and very low recurrence rate. There were no intraoperative complications yet one patient treated with an AmbioDryTM allograft developed corneal and scleral melt with the need to apply a patch graft and temporary tarsorrhaphy. Conclusions: Utilizing the treatment combination of conjunctival autograft, punctal occlusion by cautery, temporary tarsorrhaphy, and aggressive postoperative lubrication results in good patient comfort and low incidence of recurrence of primary pterygia.

Keywords: Pterygium • conjunctiva • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×