May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Hydrogel Contact Lens (HCL) Wear in Controlled Adverse Environment (CAE) Conditions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M.J. Gonzalez–Garcia
    Ocular Surface Group, IOBA,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • A. Gonzalez–Saiz
    Ocular Surface Group, IOBA,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • J.M. Herreras
    Ocular Surface Group, IOBA,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • A. Mayo
    Ocular Surface Group, IOBA,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • B. de la Fuente
    CAE Laboratory, School of Architecture,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • J. San Jose
    CAE Laboratory, School of Architecture,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • J. Feijo
    CAE Laboratory, School of Architecture,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • M.E. Stern
    Biological Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA
  • M. Calonge
    Ocular Surface Group, IOBA,
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.J. Gonzalez–Garcia, None; A. Gonzalez–Saiz, None; J.M. Herreras, None; A. Mayo, None; B. de la Fuente, None; J. San Jose, None; J. Feijo, None; M.E. Stern, Allergan, Inc. E; M. Calonge, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2066. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M.J. Gonzalez–Garcia, A. Gonzalez–Saiz, J.M. Herreras, A. Mayo, B. de la Fuente, J. San Jose, J. Feijo, M.E. Stern, M. Calonge; Hydrogel Contact Lens (HCL) Wear in Controlled Adverse Environment (CAE) Conditions . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2066.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Abstract:
 

Hydrogel contact lenses (HCL) comfort decreases with wearing time, which exacerbate in adverse (ie low humidity) environments. We exposed low and high water content HCL symptomatic wearers to a controlled adverse environment (CAE) to test influence of low humidity on ocular surface health and HCL tolerance.

 

Ten symptomatic HCL wearers with 2 out of 4 dry eye tests altered were recruited and exposed to CAE (22 ± 2ºC, 20% ± 5% humidity, no air flow, reading activity) for 2 h. In visit 1 subjects wore no HCL. In VISIT 2, subjects were fitted with LOW water content (silicone hydrogel) HCL. In VISIT 3 subjects wore HIGH water content HC. Visits 2 and 3 was randomised and double masked. Comfort, dry eye symptoms, NIBUT, BUT, bulbar and limbar hyperemia, fluorescein staining, phenol red thread test, Schirmer test and tear lysozime concentration were evaluated before and after CAE exposure.

 

Significant differences (Student's t test) before and after CAE exposure in the different visits were found (table1).

 

Table 1: Significant (p<0.05) changes after CAE exposure (mean difference ± standard deviation)

 

 

In addition, low and high water content HCL behaved similarly in this low humidity environment.

 

Symptoms and signs (conjunctival hyperemia and fluorescein staining) increased and comfort decreased when HCL were worn in CAE. Lens water content made no difference in this type of dry environment. Additionally, even without wearing HCL, low humidity had an impact on ocular surface health.

 

 
Keywords: contact lens • cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye • cornea: clinical science 
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