May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Comparison of IOP Response to Topical Beta–Adrenergic Antagonists and Prostaglandin Analogues in African Americans and Whites: The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S.L. Mansberger
    Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • B.A. Hughes
    Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI
  • M.O. Gordon
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • S.L. Spaner
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • J.A. Beiser
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • G.A. Cioffi
    Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • M.A. Kass
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) Group
    Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.L. Mansberger, Alcon R; Pfizer R; B.A. Hughes, Alcon R; M.O. Gordon, None; S.L. Spaner, None; J.A. Beiser, None; G.A. Cioffi, Alcon C, R; Pfizer C, R; Allergan C, R; Santen C, R; M.A. Kass, Pfizer F.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grants EY 09307, EY 09341, Merck Research Laboratories and Unrestricted Grants from Research to
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2449. doi:
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      S.L. Mansberger, B.A. Hughes, M.O. Gordon, S.L. Spaner, J.A. Beiser, G.A. Cioffi, M.A. Kass, Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) Group; Comparison of IOP Response to Topical Beta–Adrenergic Antagonists and Prostaglandin Analogues in African Americans and Whites: The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2449.

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Abstract
 
Abstract:
 

To compare IOP responses of self–identified African American and White participants in the initial one–eyed trials with either topical beta adrenergic antagonists or prostaglandin analogues.

 

Of the 1,636 participants randomized in the OHTS, 817 subjects were assigned to receive topical ocular hypotensive medication. Monotherapy was initiated in the eye with the higher baseline IOP in a one–eyed trial of 4–6 weeks duration. Topical medication was selected at the investigator’s discretion. After June 2002, participants originally randomized to observation were offered medication and started one–eyed trials. Because most one–eyed trials were conducted with non–selective beta blockers and prostaglandin analogues, we only report these classes of medications.

 

In the multivariate model, baseline intraocular pressure and corneal thickness had a strong association with the magnitude of the IOP reduction in the treated eye (p<0.0001). By univariate analysis, ethnic differences in response were evident, but after adjustment for baseline IOP, central corneal thickness, history of diabetes, systemic hypertension, age and gender (SEE TABLE), no differences in IOP response remained between self–identified African Americans and Whites in the initial one–eyed trial with non–selective beta blockers (p=0.90) or with prostaglandin analogues (p=0.15).

 

 

There appears to be no difference between self–identified African Americans and Whites in IOP response to non–selective beta blockers or prostaglandin analogues in initial one–eyed trials in OHTS. Adjusting for baseline IOP and corneal thickness is important when comparing response to ocular hypotensive medication in different ethnic groups.

 

 
Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled 
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