May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Response of Microbial Keratitis to Fourth Generation Fluoroquinolones
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A.F. Koreishi
    Cornea,
    Bascom Palmer Eye Inst, Miami, FL
  • E. Aliprandis
    Cornea,
    Bascom Palmer Eye Inst, Miami, FL
  • D. Miller
    Microbiology,
    Bascom Palmer Eye Inst, Miami, FL
  • E. Alfonso
    Cornea,
    Bascom Palmer Eye Inst, Miami, FL
  • S. Yoo
    Cornea,
    Bascom Palmer Eye Inst, Miami, FL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.F. Koreishi, None; E. Aliprandis, None; D. Miller, None; E. Alfonso, None; S. Yoo, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2627. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A.F. Koreishi, E. Aliprandis, D. Miller, E. Alfonso, S. Yoo; Response of Microbial Keratitis to Fourth Generation Fluoroquinolones . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2627.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To assess the outcomes of culture–positive microbial keratitis treated with the commercially available fourth generation fluoroquinolones, Moxifloxacin and Gatifloxacin. Methods: Positive culture results for patients treated with fourth generation fluoroquinolones were analyzed for pathogens and susceptibility profiles. Charts corresponding to these culture results were reviewed to assess clinical outcomes and specifically in–vivo antibiotic response. Results: Of the culture–positive isolates, 47% were non–bacterial (fungi, acanthamoeba, nocardia), while 53% were gram positive and negative bacteria. General bacterial susceptibility was 94% for moxifloxacin and 92% for gatifloxacin. In patients pre–treated with fourth generation fluoroquinolones, S. aureus and S. epidermidis were the most common gram positive pathogens and P. aeruginosa was the most frequent gram negative isolate. Conclusions: The majority of culture–positive microbial keratitis pre–treated with the new fourth generation fluoroquinolones was bacterial; however, a large number of isolates was non–bacterial. The microbiology isolates that showed in–vitro resistance to the fourth generation fluoroquinolones were analyzed and cross–referenced to clinical outcomes.

Keywords: keratitis 
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