May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
The Effect of Lens Proteins on Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma Cell Lines
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Faingold
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • O. Kasner
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • J.–C.A. Marshall
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • S. Bakalian
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • E. Antecka
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • M.N. Burnier, Jr
    Ophthalmology, The Henry C. Witelson Ocular Pathology Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D. Faingold, None; O. Kasner, None; J.A. Marshall, None; S. Bakalian, None; E. Antecka, None; M.N. Burnier, Jr., None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 3874. doi:
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      D. Faingold, O. Kasner, J.–C.A. Marshall, S. Bakalian, E. Antecka, M.N. Burnier, Jr; The Effect of Lens Proteins on Proliferation in Uveal Melanoma Cell Lines . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):3874.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Human and animal lenses support increases in cellular density in several conditions such as posterior subcapsular cataract formation and posterior capsular opacification. However, malignant lens tumors in humans have never been described. The lens protein alpha–crystallin is one of the major water soluble proteins in the vertebrate ocular lens and plays an important role in maintaining transparency and refractive index distribution. Alpha crystallins are members of the small heat–shock protein family (sHsps) and share many properties in vitro such as interaction with cytoskeletal proteins, DNA binding, antiapoptotic activity and the ability to act as molecular chaperones. In animal models, sHsps play a role in tumor recognition and regression. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of the lens protein alpha–crystallin on the proliferation rates of different uveal melanoma cell lines. Methods: Two human uveal melanoma cell lines (92.1, OCM–1) of differing proliferation rates were used to measure the effect of bovine α–crystalline A and α–crystalline B (Sigma) on cell proliferation. Quantitative analysis measuring cell growth with and without lens protein extract at different concentrations (10–5 to 10–10) was performed with the Sulforhodamine–B (TOX–6, Sigma) assay as per the National Cancer Institute protocol. Results were statistically compared using the Students T test. Results: Analysis measuring cell growth showed a statistically significant reduction in the proliferation of the uveal melanoma cell lines in the presence of α–crystalline A at concentrations of 10–7 to 10–10 (p<0.05). In comparison, the addition of α–crystalline B gave an increase in proliferation in the same range of concentration, from 10–7 to 10–11 for both the 92.1 and OCM–1 cell lines respectively (p<0.05). Conclusions: We demonstrate a significant decrease in the proliferation rates of both uveal melanoma cell lines in the presence of lens protein α–crystalline A. These results suggest that α–crystallin A, in addition to its structural role in the lens, may play a major role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. This inhibition may explain the lack of malignant transformation of lens epithelial cells and the absence of lens primary tumors.

Keywords: melanoma • pathology: human 
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