May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Cryopreservation of Organ Cultured Human Donor Corneas
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Halberstadt
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
  • B. Frueh
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
  • M. Kilchenmann
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
  • F. Flückiger
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
  • M. Hagenah
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, 30625 Hannover, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Halberstadt, None; B. Frueh, None; M. Kilchenmann, None; F. Flückiger, None; M. Hagenah, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 4529. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      M. Halberstadt, B. Frueh, M. Kilchenmann, F. Flückiger, M. Hagenah; Cryopreservation of Organ Cultured Human Donor Corneas . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):4529.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To assess the impact of organ culture time prior to cryopreservation on freeze–thaw induced endothelial cell loss. Thereby, evaluating the possibility of cryopreservation of human corneas as a method to extend storage time after organ culturing. Methods: Twenty–seven human donor corneas who had been organ cultured for up to 42 days (mean 22.8 ± 12.9) were cryopreserved in minimal essential medium containing 10% dextran with a molecular weight of 500,000 as an extracellular cryoprotectant, at a cooling rate of 1°C/min and then stored in liquid nitrogen at –196°C. After thawing, the tissue was again organ cultured to detect latent cell damage. Results: After cryopreservation and subsequent organ culturing, the endothelial cell density dropped by 30.5% to 1404 ± 483 cells/mm2, and 2 of the corneas had a completely necrotic endothelium (p= 0.002). Univariate analysis revealed an organ culture period of more than 28 days to have a significant impact on endothelial cell loss after thawing (p< 0.001). Variables like duration of deswelling period in dextran (p= 0.929), post–mortem time (p= 0.727), cell loss during organ culture prior to freezing (p= 0.178), and age (p= 0.689) revealed to have no significant impact on freeze–thaw induced endothelial cell loss. Conclusions: After an organ culture period of up to 3 weeks the tissue can still be cryopreserved and stored for an indefinite time without a significant increase of endothelial cell loss.

Keywords: cornea: storage • cornea: endothelium • transplantation 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×