May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Steroid and Nonsteroidal Medications Can Enhance Photoreceptor Survival Following Argon Laser Retinal Photocoagulation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Brown
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
    Ophthalmology Associates of San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
  • S.T. Schuschereba
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • H.D. Hacker
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • R.E. Cheramie
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • H. Zwick
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • D.J. Lund
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • B.E. Stuck
    US Army Medical Research Detachment, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, San Antonio, TX
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J. Brown, None; S.T. Schuschereba, None; H.D. Hacker, None; R.E. Cheramie, None; H. Zwick, None; D.J. Lund, None; B.E. Stuck, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 4735. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J. Brown, S.T. Schuschereba, H.D. Hacker, R.E. Cheramie, H. Zwick, D.J. Lund, B.E. Stuck; Steroid and Nonsteroidal Medications Can Enhance Photoreceptor Survival Following Argon Laser Retinal Photocoagulation . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):4735.

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Abstract
 
Abstract:
 

To evaluate the treatment effect of steroid and nonsteroidal medications on the survival of retinal photoreceptors following Argon laser retinal photocoagulation in the nonhuman primate.

 

A grid of Argon laser retinal lesions was placed into the macula of a cohort of 24 sedated Rhesus monkeys. An argon laser operating at 514 nm with 100 ms pulses was used to create 200 micron spots. The animals were randomized to one of four treatment groups: high dose methylprednisolone, moderate dose methylprednisolone, indomethacin or control. The treatment was initiated within one hour of placing the retinal laser lesions. The animals were treated for fourteen days. Imaging studies were performed on day 1, day 4, day 14, two months and four months. The animals were sacrificed at four months and the eyes were harvested for histologic analysis. The histologic slide of the lesion center of each retinal lesion was digitally photographed. Using imaging software, photoreceptor cell nuclei counts within 250 microns of the center of each lesion were compared with cell counts from adjacent unaffected retina, 500 microns away. The proportion of surviving cell nuclei within the lesion, compared to surrounding unaffected retina, was defined as the viability index.

 

Histological analysis revealed that high dose methylprednisolone and indomethacin treated animals had a statistically significant improvement in photoreceptor cell nuclei survival compared to saline treated controls (p<0.01). The proportion of surviving photoreceptors was 43% greater in high dose methylprednisolone treated animals (p< 0.01), 44% greater in indomethacin treated animals (p< 0.01), and 22% greater in moderate dose methylprednisolone treated animals (n.s.) compared to control.

 

Acute treatment with high dose methylprednisolone or indomethacin results in improved photoreceptor survival four months following Argon laser photocoagulation in a primate model.

 

 

 
Keywords: laser • drug toxicity/drug effects • wound healing 
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