May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Dendritic Adhesives to Secure Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flaps
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M.W. Grinstaff
    Biomedical Engineering/Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • P.C. Kang
    Eye Center, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • M.C. Wathier
    Biomedical Engineering/Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • M.A. Carnahan
    Eye Center, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • T. Kim
    Eye Center, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.W. Grinstaff, None; P.C. Kang, None; M.C. Wathier, None; M.A. Carnahan, None; T. Kim, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  This research was supported by the NIH. We also thank the North Carolina Eye Bank. This research was supported by the NIH. We also thank the North Carolina Eye Bank.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 4995. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M.W. Grinstaff, P.C. Kang, M.C. Wathier, M.A. Carnahan, T. Kim; Dendritic Adhesives to Secure Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flaps . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):4995.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate a light activated and a self–gelling biodendrimer–based hydrogel adhesive for sealing laser in–situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps. Methods: LASIK flaps were created in 10 human eyebank eyes using the Hansatome microkeratome system. These eyes were then divided into two groups. Flaps in the first group (n=4) were secured with a laser–activated biodendrimer adhesive along the flap edge. In the second group (n=6), the flaps were secured with a self–gelling dendritic adhesive. Dry Merocel sponges were used to test the strength of flap adherence in both groups. The hinges of these flaps were cut with a scalpel blade and fluorescein dye was injected under the flap to observe any potential dye leakage along the flap edge. Results: The LASIK flaps were secured using both adhesives with no flap dislocation. There was no leakage of fluorescein dye observed indicating that an effective seal was made at the wound. Both adhesives were easy to apply, clear, and had a soft rubbery consistency. Conclusions: The biodendrimer–based adhesives are an effective alternative to sutures for securing LASIK flaps and as such may prove to be an effective treatment option for LASIK flap complications, such as epithelial ingrowth or flap dislocation. Support: This research was supported by the NIH. We also thank the North Carolina Eye Bank.

Keywords: refractive surgery: LASIK • wound healing • cornea: basic science 
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