May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Efficacy of Radiologic Evaluation of Intracorneal Metallic Foreign Bodies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Schrier
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • I. Barbazetto
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • C. Shih
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • J. Walrath
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • E. Smith
    Ophthalmology, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
  • S. Merriam
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Schrier, None; I. Barbazetto, None; C. Shih, None; J. Walrath, None; E. Smith, None; S. Merriam, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant 13435, RPB and Macula Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 5034. doi:
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      A. Schrier, I. Barbazetto, C. Shih, J. Walrath, E. Smith, S. Merriam; Efficacy of Radiologic Evaluation of Intracorneal Metallic Foreign Bodies . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):5034.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of routine radiologic evaluation of intracorneal metallic foreign bodies. Methods: Patients with confirmed intracorneal metallic foreign bodies by bimicroscopic exam were sent for radiologic evaluation before removal of the foreign body to rule out the presence of additional intraocular foreign bodies. Four radiologic views were taken: Waters view, Rhese view, Anterior/Posterior (A/P) view, and Lateral view. The radiographic studies were examined by both the referring ophthalmologist as well as the radiologist. Results: Seven out of seven eyes with confirmed intracorneal metallic foreign bodies by bimicroscopy were evaluated by four standard radiographic views and showed no radiographic evidence of metal in the orbital or ocular areas. Conclusions:The use of adjunct X–rays does not aid in the diagnosis of intracorneal foreign bodies in our study. This calls into question the usefulness of X–ray studies for the detection of small occult metallic foreign bodies in general. Routine radiologic evaluation by X–ray of patients with intracorneal metallic foreign bodies does not substiture for a comprehensive eye exam.

Keywords: trauma • cornea: clinical science • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower 
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