May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
S. Aureur Biofilm Associated With Chronic Scleral Buckle Infection and Endophthalmitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • B. Alexandrescu
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University–Harkness Eye Institute, New York, NY
  • M. Engelbert
    Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • S. Chang
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University–Harkness Eye Institute, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  B. Alexandrescu, None; M. Engelbert, None; S. Chang, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 5563. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      B. Alexandrescu, M. Engelbert, S. Chang; S. Aureur Biofilm Associated With Chronic Scleral Buckle Infection and Endophthalmitis . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):5563.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To report a case of S.aureus buckle infection which was active over an 11 year period after initial surgery and which displayed the hallmark clinical features of a biofilm associated infection, namely late onset and chronically intractable course and which was associated with a microbial biofilm on the anchoring suture. Methods: Review of clinical case presentation, microbiology studies, and pathology imaging including H&E staining and electron microscopy. Results: S. aureus biofilms were demonstrated on the anchoring mersilene suture and were characterized by an absence of inflammatory cells. Pathologically, S. aureus biofilm was demonstrated on both between the fibers of the braided thread and on the exterior surface of the mersilene suture, as well as in the surrounding fibrous and granulomatous tissue. This case of S.aureus buckle infection displayed the hallmark clinical features of a biofilm associated infection, namely late onset and chronically intractable course and which was associated with a microbial biofilm on the anchoring suture. Conclusions: Biofilms, which are complex mono– or multi–organism communities of bacteria often organized in matrices of polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, have been associated with chronic infections of various implant materials including scleral buckles. This particular physiological mode appears to convey several advantages to organisms, in particular resistance to antimicrobial substances and host defense mechanisms. This unique clinical case demonstrates how S. aureus biofilms may confer resistance to host immune systems, topical and systemic antibiotics, and may cause intractable scleral buckle infections that can be manifest as late as 11 years after retinal detachment surgery.

Keywords: endophthalmitis • Staphylococcus 
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