May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Impact of Full–Time and Part–Time Patching on the Child, Family and Compliance
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M.I. Shenouda
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Mercy Hosp/Univ MO–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
  • J. Smith
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Mercy Hosp/Univ MO–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
  • T. Hug
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Mercy Hosp/Univ MO–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
  • S.E. Olitsky
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Mercy Hosp/Univ MO–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.I. Shenouda, None; J. Smith, None; T. Hug, None; S.E. Olitsky, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 5704. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M.I. Shenouda, J. Smith, T. Hug, S.E. Olitsky; Impact of Full–Time and Part–Time Patching on the Child, Family and Compliance . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):5704.

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To assess the psychosocial impact on the child and family and its relation to compliance of full versus part–time patching as treatments for strabismic, refractive, and deprivation amblyopia in children of various ages Methods: Families of patients who have received full–time, part–time, or both full–time and part–time patching were contacted and a quality–of–life questionaire was read to them. A total of 68 patients were surveyed. Results: Compliance with patching was excellent or good 68% (CI 53%–80%) for full time patching vs. 54% (CI 40%–70%) for part–time patching. There were no statistically significant differences in eye irritation between full and part–time patching patients (overall mean, 3.46 vs.3.54 for full versus part–time patching). Respondents who had trouble putting and keeping the patch on, reported complaints by the child, worried that the child didn't wear the patch enough, sometimes forgot the put on the patch, and thought that patching caused relationship problems were likely to have a lower compliance score. Problems between family members occured more in families who were patching children who had deprivation amblyopia (overall means, 2.60, 3.76, and 3.86 for deprivation, strabismic and refractive patients). Children with strabismic and deprivation amblyopia were perceived to complain about patching more than those with refractive amblyopia (overall means, 1.74, 2.00 and 2.55 for strabismic, deprivation, and refractive patients). In general, males were perceived to be more clumsy and uncoordinated than females while patching (overall mean, 2.70 vs. 3.39 males vs. females). Conclusions: Compliance with patching may be related to the form of amblyopia being treated. Families who reported diffculties with patching or who were concerned that patching may create relationship problems within the family were less likely to demonstrate good compliance. Compliance with patching and perceived difficulties with patching were unrelated to the amount of patching prescribed. This information may be useful given the results of recent amblyopia treatment studies.

Keywords: amblyopia 
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