May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
High–Speed Optical Coherence Tomography of Corneal Pathologies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. Bhatnagar
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • M.R. Chalita
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • D. Meisler
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • Y. Li
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • M.V. Netto
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • D. Huang
    Ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  P. Bhatnagar, None; M.R. Chalita, None; D. Meisler, None; Y. Li, None; M.V. Netto, None; D. Huang, Zeiss F, P.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 145. doi:
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      P. Bhatnagar, M.R. Chalita, D. Meisler, Y. Li, M.V. Netto, D. Huang; High–Speed Optical Coherence Tomography of Corneal Pathologies . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):145.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To use a high–speed corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (CAS–OCT) system to image corneal pathologies. Methods: A high–speed CAS–OCT system was developed. It uses a longer wavelength (1.3 microns) compared to retina OCT systems (0.8 microns) and performs 2000 axial scans/second. OCT scans were performed in 3 patients, one each with spheroidal degeneration, granular dystrophy, and keratoconus with hydrops. Results: Full–thickness imaging of the cornea in all cases was possible. In the keratoconus case with hydrops it was possible to visualize corneal thinning and a Descemet’s membrane tear with detachment. In the spheroidal degeneration case the opacities were found within the epithelium or had a sub–epithelial location. In the granular dystrophy case the greatest concentration of lesions was localized to the anterior stroma with fewer in the deeper layers. Conclusions: The CAS–OCT prototype allowed non–contact visualization of corneal pathologies.

Keywords: cornea: clinical science • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • imaging/image analysis: clinical 
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