May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
The Association Between Host Factors and UV Exposure in Uveal and Conjunctival Melanoma: A Meta Analysis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. Weis
    Ophthalmology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
  • C. Shah
    Ophthalmology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentisry, Rochester, NY
  • M. Lajous
    Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
  • C. Shields
    Ocular Oncology, Will's Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • J. Shields
    Ocular Oncology, Will's Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  E. Weis, None; C. Shah, None; M. Lajous, None; C. Shields, None; J. Shields, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1215. doi:
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      E. Weis, C. Shah, M. Lajous, C. Shields, J. Shields; The Association Between Host Factors and UV Exposure in Uveal and Conjunctival Melanoma: A Meta Analysis . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1215.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To conduct a meta–analysis using observational studies to examine the relationship between ultraviolet (UV) light exposure and host susceptibility factors on uveal and conjunctival melanoma. Methods:Data from 19 studies was extracted and categorized the data into four a priori groups: 1) Chronic UV exposure, 2) Intermittent UV exposure, 3) Host factors, and 4) Combined host factor and UV exposure variables. Summary statistics were calculated for all risk factors with four independent studies. Results:The chronic UV exposure variables of combined lifetime UV exposure and outdoor occupation (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.14 – 1.89, p = 0.003, n = 1036) and outdoor occupation alone (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.24 – 2.29, p = 0.001, n = 911) were statistically significant risk factors for uveal and conjunctival melanoma. Latitude of birth was insignificant (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.67 – 1.74, p = 0.75, n = 1765). The intermittent UV exposure variable of outdoor leisure was not significant (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.71 – 1.04, p = 0.117, n = 1332). The host factors of eye color (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.31 – 2.34, p<0.001, n = 1732), skin color (OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.31 – 2.47, p = <0.001, n = 586), and propensity to sunburn (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.18 – 1.93, p = 0.001, n = 1021) were all significant risk factors. Hair color was not a significant independent risk factor (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.83 – 1.26, p = 0.215, n = 1012). The combined host factor and UV exposure variables of skin freckles (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.09 – 1.48, p = 0.002, n = 1596) and of a combined nevi construct of iris nevi, dysplastic skin nevi, and non–dysplastic skin nevi (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.41 – 2.12, p < 0.001, n = 1683) were each significant. Conclusions:Our meta–analysis yielded evidence associating both chronic UV exposure and host susceptibility factors with uveal and conjunctival melanoma.

Keywords: melanoma • oncology 
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