May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Clinical, Cytological And Immunophenotypical Characteristics Of Primary Lymphoma Of Retina And Vitreous. An Analysis Of 20 Cases.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R.L. Font
    Cullen Eye Institute,
    Pathology,
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • K. Rishi
    Cullen Eye Institute,
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • W.F. Mieler
    Cullen Eye Institute,
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • P. Chevez–Barrios
    Cullen Eye Institute,
    Pathology,
    Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R.L. Font, None; K. Rishi, None; W.F. Mieler, None; P. Chevez–Barrios, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Retina Research Foundation, Houston, Texas, and Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc, New York, NY
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1228. doi:
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      R.L. Font, K. Rishi, W.F. Mieler, P. Chevez–Barrios; Clinical, Cytological And Immunophenotypical Characteristics Of Primary Lymphoma Of Retina And Vitreous. An Analysis Of 20 Cases. . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1228.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To study the clinical, cytological and immunophenotypical characteristics of primary lymphoma of the retina and vitreous.Methods: We reviewed the clinical data on 20 cases of vitreous specimens diagnosed as lymphoma in the Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory at the Cullen Eye Institute from 1996–2003. Additionally, the cytological and immunophenotypical features of the specimens using liquid based cytology, cytospin, cell block, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry were analyzed. Results: Sixteen (16/20) cases were classified as B cell lymphoma and four (4/20) cases were of T cell origin lymphoma. The median age of the patients in our series was 59 years (range 19–79 years). Twelve were females and eight males. The most common ophthalmoscopic appearance was vitritis. Five patients (5/20) had CNS involvement and two (2/20) had systemic involvement prior to the ocular manifestations. Flow cytometry was performed in thirteen cases (13/20) confirming the B cell origin in nine cases and T cell origin in two cases. Immunohistochemical stains performed on air–dried slides (cytospin method) and cell blocks using B and T cell markers were diagnostic in the five cases. One of the T–cell lymphomas with inconclusive flow cytometry was confirmed by PCR (gene rearrangement). The remaining three cases (3/20) were primarily diagnosed by the liquid based cytology and cytospin methods. Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of a combined analytic approach including clinical findings, cytological and immunophenotypical evaluation of vitrectomy specimens to reach a correct diagnosis and exact classification of primary intraocular lymphomas.

Keywords: oncology • flow cytometry • cytology 
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