May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Immunohistochemical localization of advanced glycation end products in pinguecula.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Y. Kaji
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Science, Tsukuba–shi, Japan
  • T. Oshika
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Science, Tsukuba–shi, Japan
  • S. Amano
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • T. Hiraoka
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Science, Tsukuba–shi, Japan
  • F. Okamoto
    Department of Ophthalmology, Univ of Tsukuba Institute of Clinical Science, Tsukuba–shi, Japan
  • S. Horiuchi
    Department of Medical Biochemistry, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kumamoto, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Y. Kaji, None; T. Oshika, None; S. Amano, None; T. Hiraoka, None; F. Okamoto, None; S. Horiuchi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1481. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Y. Kaji, T. Oshika, S. Amano, T. Hiraoka, F. Okamoto, S. Horiuchi; Immunohistochemical localization of advanced glycation end products in pinguecula. . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1481.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Pinguecula is one of the most common age–related ocular lesions. However, the exact nature and pathogenesis of pinguecula are not fully elucidated. Recently, advanced glycation end products (AGE’s) have been postulated as key molecules that are connected with the ageing process. To investigate the nature and pathogenesis of pinguecula, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of AGE in pinguecula. Methods: We investigated the immunohistochemical localization of AGE’s in nine surgical specimens of pinguecula from 9 patients (5 male and 4 female, 66.2 ± 17.2 years old; mean ± standard deviation) and eight conjunctival tissues without pinguecula from 8 patients (4 male and 4 female, 61.5 ± 21.3 years old). The localization of Nε–(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), a major component of AGE’s, was investigated with immunohistochemistry using a specific monoclonal antibody to CML and the streptavidin–biotin complex method. Results: Strong immunoreactivity of CML was present in all the specimens of pinguecula. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was observed in the conjunctival tissues in the controls. In general, the darker the color of pinguecula, the stronger the immunoreactivity to CML became. Conclusions: The present study revealed that pinguecula represents aggregation of AGE’s. We believe that the deposition of AGE’s in pinguecula reflects not only the local age–related changes but also the systemic ageing process. Our results indicate that the color and the size of pinguecula would be a visible index of ageing of the body.

Keywords: aging • glycoconjugates/glycoproteins • conjunctiva 
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