May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
The UBC Multiple Sclerosis Clinic – : Neuro–ophthalmic Manifestations of Demyelination: the First Two Decades
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Fisher
    Faculty of Medicine,
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • D. Anderson
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • J. Lindley
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • K. Wade
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Fisher, None; D. Anderson, None; J. Lindley, None; K. Wade, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1599. doi:
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      T. Fisher, D. Anderson, J. Lindley, K. Wade; The UBC Multiple Sclerosis Clinic – : Neuro–ophthalmic Manifestations of Demyelination: the First Two Decades . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1599.

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To describe the demographic features and neuro–ophthalmic sensory and motor deficits of 2867 patients who presented to the UBC Multiple Sclerosis Neuro–ophthalmology Clinic over a 20 year period. The aim of this study was also to determine the most prevalent ocular signs and symptoms as indicators of MS. Methods:The UBC Multiple Sclerosis Clinic has been referring patients to the MS Neuro–ophthalmology Clinic since 1980. This study is a retrospective analysis of the baseline data collected during initial neuro–ophthalmic consultations between 1980 and 1999. Data was collected on a standardized form by 6 neuro–ophthalmologists, and subsequently described and analyzed by laterality. Results:A total of 2867 patients with definite MS diagnoses were referred to the MS Clinic neuro–ophthalmologists. The average age of MS onset was 31.75 years (range: 4–74). Total percentages of patients with sensory deficits were as follows: colour acuity (n=2413) – 80.0%; low contrast acuity (n=1299) – 71.6%; optic disc pallor (n=2463) – 60.0%; visual acuity (n=2307) – 54.8%. Total percentages of patients with motor deficits were as follows: nystagmus (n=2625) – 33.9%; pursuit (n=1741) – 22.6%; INO (n=2581) – 14.6%; saccades (n=1399) – 11.0%; saccadic intrusions (n=1442) – 7.5%; gaze palsy (n=1557) – 2.2%; sixth nerve palsy (n=1524) – 2.0%. Conclusions:Neuro–ophthalmologists observed a high burden of visual deficits in patients attending the UBC Multiple Sclerosis Neuro–ophthalmology clinic over a 20 year period. The most common afferent deficits were decreased colour acuity and low contrast acuity. The most common efferent deficits were nystagmus and broken smooth pursuit.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • neuro–ophthalmology: diagnosis • visual impairment: neuro–ophthalmological disease 
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