May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Analysis Of Human Anterior Lens Capsule By Time–of–flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Y. Kishikawa
    Ophthalmology, Nagasaki university, Nagasaki, Japan
  • T. Kitaoka
    Ophthalmology, Nagasaki university, Nagasaki, Japan
  • N. Iida
    ULVAC–PHI, INC, Chigasaki, Japan
  • A. Yamamoto
    ULVAC–PHI, INC, Chigasaki, Japan
  • Y. Ohashi
    ULVAC–PHI, INC, Chigasaki, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Y. Kishikawa, None; T. Kitaoka, None; N. Iida, None; A. Yamamoto, None; Y. Ohashi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1694. doi:
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      Y. Kishikawa, T. Kitaoka, N. Iida, A. Yamamoto, Y. Ohashi; Analysis Of Human Anterior Lens Capsule By Time–of–flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1694.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To examine the substances in human anterior lens capsule with Time–Of–Flight Secondary Ion Mass spectrometer (TOF–SIMS), which can detect the substance whose amount is very small and can detect not only elements but also organic substances. Methods: The human anterior lens capsules were collected from 11 patients at cataract surgery or at combined cataract surgery with vitrectomy. Several elements, which include trace elements, 3–hydroxyproline and 5–hydroxylysine were measured with TOF–SIMS. During the analysis, the surface of each specimen, which had been stored in liquid nitrogen, was spattered with a primary Ga+ ion beam at a constant acceleration of 15 KeV for 5 minutes, and spattered ions were detected by mass spectrometer. The average ratio of each substance count/total substance count was calculated. Then it was examined whether there is a significant difference between data of group A (anterior lens capsules of Emery–Little grade 0∼1 cataract, n=5) and those of group B (anterior lens capsules of Emery–Little grade 2 cataract, n=6). Results: The average ratios of Ca and Mg ion counts to the total count of spattered ions of group B was significantly larger than those of group A. There was no significant difference between average ratios of trace elements ion counts to the total count of spattered ions of group A and those of group B. There was no significant difference between average ratios of 3–hydroxyproline and 5–hydroxylysine ion counts to the total count of spattered ions of group A and those of group B. Conclusions: Concentration of Ca ion in the lens is supposed to increase according to the increase of lens opacity. TOF–SIMS data also suggest increased concentration of Ca ion in anterior lens capsule according to the increase of lens opacity. It was reported that the collagen of anterior lens capsule contains lots of 3–hydroxyprolines and 5–hydroxylysines. TOF–SIMS data suggest progress of lens opacity does not change this character.

Keywords: cataract • pathology: human 
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