May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
The Role of Nitric Oxide in Angiogenesisin the Globally Hypoxic Retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Kirwan
    Department of Physiology, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • K. Howell
    Department of Physiology, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • C. O'Brien
    Institute of Ophthalmology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  • P. McLoughlin
    Department of Physiology, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C. Kirwan, None; K. Howell, None; C. O'Brien, None; P. McLoughlin, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1902. doi:
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      C. Kirwan, K. Howell, C. O'Brien, P. McLoughlin; The Role of Nitric Oxide in Angiogenesisin the Globally Hypoxic Retina . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1902.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: It has been previously shown in our laboratory that hypoxia induces retinal neovascularisation (angiogenesis) in the adult rat. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated the role played by nitric oxide, which has been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis in other organ systems. Using vessel volume and vessel volume density as indices of angiogenesis, the effect of dietary supplementation with L–NAME, a non specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase was examined. Methods: Adult male Wystar Kyoto rats (n=24) were randomised to one of three groups: (a) Hypoxic environment (FiO2=0.01) and L–NAME (2g/l) in drinking water. (b) Hypoxic environment (FiO2=0.01), no L–NAME. (c) Control group: normoxic environment, no L–NAME. Stereological techniques were employed to examine retinal ganglion cell layer vasculature. Results: The mean blood vessel volume in the hypoxic, no L–NAME group was found to be more than three fold greater than that in the normoxic control group (p<0.05). A small increase was seen in this parameter in the hypoxic + L–NAME group relative to the controls which failed to reach statistical significance (p=0.74). Analysis of mean vessel volume density of the gangion cell layer revealed a large (almost two fold), statistically significant increase in the hypoxic, no L–NAME group relative to the controls (p<0.05). A much smaller but also statistically significant increase was observed in the hypoxic + L–NAME group relative to the controls (p<0.05). Conclusions: Hypoxia induced retinal angiogenesis is greatly reduced by blockade of nitric oxide production using L–NAME. These findings provide strong evidence that this phenomenon is in part mediated by nitric oxide.

Keywords: hypoxia • retinal neovascularization • nitric oxide 
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