May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Investigation of racial differences in responsiveness to frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry in normal subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Nakano
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Jikei Univ Sch Med, Tokyo, Japan
  • G. Takahashi
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Jikei Univ Sch Med, Tokyo, Japan
  • S. Demirel
    Discoveries in Sight, Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • K. Kitahara
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Jikei Univ Sch Med, Tokyo, Japan
  • C.A. Johnson
    Discoveries in Sight, Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Nakano, None; G. Takahashi, None; S. Demirel, None; K. Kitahara, None; C.A. Johnson, Welch–Allyn C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY03424
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 2136. doi:
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      T. Nakano, G. Takahashi, S. Demirel, K. Kitahara, C.A. Johnson; Investigation of racial differences in responsiveness to frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry in normal subjects . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):2136.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To investigate the racial difference in threshold for frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry between normal Japanese and normal Caucasians. Methods:A full explanation of the study requirements was made to all participants and their informed consent was obtained. Frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry was performed in normal volunteers (excluding ophthalmologic abnormalities, or systemic findings or past history that might influence the visual field) at Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Discoveries in Sight, Devers Eye Institute, Portland, Oregon. FDT perimetry (Ver.3.0) was measured twice using the N–30 threshold test with completely corrected vision. Only participants with reliable tests (i.e., fixation errors of not more than 2 out of 6 times, false positive errors of not more than 2 out of 6 times, and false negative errors of not more than 1 out of 3 times) were included. The study cohort included 96 normals whose age and sex were closely matched; 48 Japanese whose age was 35.1±10.0 years (mean±SD) and 48 Caucasians whose age was 38.6±9.7 years. Results: In FDT perimetry using the N–30 threshold program the mean deviation (MD) was –1.44 and –0.24 dB in the right eye (OD) and was –2.20 and –1.06 dB in the left eye (OS) in Japanese and Caucasians respectively, indicating significantly different MD values in both the OD and OS between these two races (OD; P=0.0027, OS; P=0.0065). The mean value of pattern standard deviation (PSD) was 3.68 and 3.94 dB in the OD and 3.75 and 3.81 dB in the OS in Japanese and Caucasians, respectively, indicating no significant difference of PSD value in either OD or OS between these two groups (OD; P=0.19, OS; P=0.75). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest the possibility that there are differences in the sensitivity to FDT perimetry between Japanese and Caucasians. The results also suggest that most attention should be paid to pattern, rather than diffuse indicators of loss.

Keywords: visual fields • perimetry 
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