May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Telomerase Interacts with Estrogen Receptor–alpha in Cataractous LEC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C.M. H. Colitz
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • C.A. Barden
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • H.L. Chandler
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • A.J. Gemensky–Metzler
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • D.A. Wilkie
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • I.D. Bras
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • Y. Sugimoto
    Veterinary Biosciences,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • T.F. Mauger
    Ophthalmology,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • R.G. Lembach
    Ophthalmology,
    Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C.M.H. Colitz, None; C.A. Barden, None; H.L. Chandler, None; A.J. Gemensky–Metzler, None; D.A. Wilkie, None; I.D. Bras, None; Y. Sugimoto, None; T.F. Mauger, None; R.G. Lembach, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH NEI 00414–05
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 2649. doi:
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      C.M. H. Colitz, C.A. Barden, H.L. Chandler, A.J. Gemensky–Metzler, D.A. Wilkie, I.D. Bras, Y. Sugimoto, T.F. Mauger, R.G. Lembach; Telomerase Interacts with Estrogen Receptor–alpha in Cataractous LEC . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):2649.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Estrogen receptor alpha (ER) is present in the human and bovine lens epithelium (LEC) and estrogen protects human LEC from oxidative stress. We evaluated ER and its potential role in cataractous LEC as preliminary work has shown an increased interaction of telomerase (TERT) with estrogen response element (ERE) in cataracts compared to normal LEC, regardless of sex. Methods: Samples included cataractous canine and human anterior lens capsules, normal canine lenses, and human lens capsules with posterior capsular opacification (PCO). Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed to confirm the presence of ER in canine LEC. Co–immunoprecipitation was performed on normal and cataractous canine and human lens capsules using anti–ER antibody and immunoblotted with anti–TERT antibody. Results: Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of ER in canine LEC and discovered increased expression of ER canine cataracts compared to normal canine LEC. Co–immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between ER and TERT in human and canine cataractous LEC and in the human lens capsule with PCO, but not in normal older canine LEC. None of the data regarding ER was sex specific. Conclusions: As in other species, ER is present in canine LEC and we found that cataractous LEC have increased expression of ER compared to normal LEC. We had previously reported that a transcription factor array identified increased interaction between ERE and TERT in diabetic and inherited canine cataractous LEC, decreased interaction in young normal canine LEC and no interaction in old canine normal LEC. Co–immunoprecipitation confirmed these findings and found this interaction in the human samples. Together, this data suggests that ER is increased in cataractous LEC, though it is uncertain if it is a cause or an effect. Our findings that the interactions are independent of sex may suggest that this is an estrogen independent event in LEC. Based on our data, we hypothesize that ER may play a direct or indirect role in cataractogenesis, regardless of sex, via telomerase.

Keywords: protein structure/function 
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