May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Relationship of change in intraocular pressure to change in systemic blood pressure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • B.E. K. Klein
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • R. Klein
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • M.D. Knudtson
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  B.E.K. Klein, None; R. Klein, None; M.D. Knudtson, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY06594
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 3413. doi:
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      B.E. K. Klein, R. Klein, M.D. Knudtson; Relationship of change in intraocular pressure to change in systemic blood pressure . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):3413.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate whether changes in systemic blood pressures are associated with changes in intraocular pressure. Methods: 4926 persons 43–86 years of age were examined in 1988–1990. The blood pressures and intraocular pressures were measured by protocols and a standard history including medication usage was taken. The cohort was seen five years after the baseline examination and the same information was obtained (n=3684). Results: The mean intraocular pressure in the right eye, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressures at baseline were15.4 mmHg, 132 mmHg and 77mmHg respectively. In right eyes there was an increase of about 0.30 mmHg in intraocular pressure for a 10 mmHg increase in systolic pressure and about 0.50 mmHg increase in IOP for a 10 mmHg increase in diastolic blood pressure. Anti–hypertensive medication was used by 34% of persons at baseline and most of these remained on medication at the second examination. 12% took such medication only at the second examination. In general, the use of anti–hypertensive medications was associated with variations in the mean blood pressures and intraocular pressures at baseline and at follow–up. There was a decrease of about 0.20 mmHg in IOP for a decrease of 10 mmHg systolic blood pressure and a decrease of about 0.50 mmHg in IOP for a decrease of 10 mmHg diastolic blood pressure for persons who took anti–hypertensive medications at baseline and five year follow–up examination. Conclusions: Intraocular pressure was associated with systemic blood pressure and changes in the latter were associated with changes in the former. It is possible that treating hypertension may be associated with decreased risk of open angle glaucoma.

Keywords: intraocular pressure • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: biostatistics/epidemiology methodology • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials 
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