May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
The Prevalence of Glaucoma Among Blacks and Whites 74 Years of Age and Older (The Salisbury EyeEvaluation Glaucoma Study)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.S. Friedman
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • B. Munoz
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • H.D. Jampel
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • K. Turano
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • S.K. West
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.S. Friedman, None; B. Munoz, None; H.D. Jampel, None; K. Turano, None; S.K. West, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY13460
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 3414. doi:
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      D.S. Friedman, B. Munoz, H.D. Jampel, K. Turano, S.K. West; The Prevalence of Glaucoma Among Blacks and Whites 74 Years of Age and Older (The Salisbury EyeEvaluation Glaucoma Study) . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):3414.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine the prevalence of glaucoma among black and white persons 74 years of age and older. Methods: The original Salisbury Eye Evaluation (SEE) cohort was invited for a follow–up examination including visual field testing and optic nerve head imaging. All subjects with abnormal visual fields, increased cup/disc ratio, elevated eye pressure, family history of glaucoma, or history of glaucoma diagnosis or treatment were referred for a definitive examination by a fellowship–trained glaucoma specialist. Individuals were defined as having glaucoma if they had a glaucomatous optic nerve in association with visual field loss or if they had severe optic nerve damage without an available, reliable, reproducible visual field. Results: Of the1,504 participants in the previous SEE evaluation, 1299 were still alive and eligible. 1,250 (96%) persons aged 74 – 93 years participated in the present study. Glaucoma was present in 10.1% of whites and 22.3% of blacks, with an angle–closure glaucoma prevalence of 0.4% in whites and 0.7% in blacks. Open–angle glaucoma (OAG) increased in prevalence with age among whites with a prevalence of 7.5% for those younger than 80 years of age, 9.3% for those 80 – 84 years, and 15.5% for those 85 years and older. OAG prevalence was higher among blacks, with rates of 18.6%, 26.3%, and 25.0% for those younger than 80, 80 – 84, and 85+ years of age, respectively. In a multivariate model adjusting for age, blacks were almost three times more likely to have glaucoma (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 2.0 – 4.2). Conclusions: Glaucoma prevalence continues to increase with age into the ninth decade. Nearly one in four blacks over the age of 80 had open–angle glaucoma in this large population–based study.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • aging • optic disc 
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