May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Five Year Consecutive Series of Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Nessim
    Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • V. Kumar
    Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • I. Kyprianou
    Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • E. O'Neill
    Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • P. Shah
    Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Nessim, None; V. Kumar, None; I. Kyprianou, None; E. O'Neill, None; P. Shah, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4500. doi:
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      M. Nessim, V. Kumar, I. Kyprianou, E. O'Neill, P. Shah; Five Year Consecutive Series of Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4500.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:Our objective is to look at long–term complications and visual outcome in patients presenting with acute angle closure glaucoma. We intend to retrospectively review all patients presenting with an episode of acute angle closure glaucoma in the city of Birmingham, United Kingdom over a five–year period. Method:All patients having acute angle closure glaucoma in the city between January 1998 and December 2002 were included. Patients were identified from eye accident and emergency records and Nd–Yag laser registers. To date 95 eyes of 87 patients have been reviewed. We have specifically looked at vision in affected and fellow eyes at presentation and final follow up. Co–morbidity as a cause of poor vision was also recorded. Analysis included risk of long term poor visual outcome in affected and fellow eyes and prognostic factors for poor visual outcome. Results:There were 62 (71.26%) females and 25 (28.74%) males. Mean age was 67 (range, 39–96) years, They have been followed for a mean of 29 (range, 1–67) months. 8 (9.1%) patients presented with bilateral angle closure. Mean IOP at presentation was 55.3 ± 13.3 mmHg in the affected eye and 23.1 ± 14 mmHg in the fellow eye. At final follow up mean IOP was 16.5 ± 4.5 mmHg in the affected eye and 16.3 ± 4.6 mmHg in the fellow eye with a mean of 0.8 antiglaucoma drops. 9 (9.5%) eyes required trabeculectomy and 4 (4.2%) eyes cyclodiode laser treatment to control IOP. 9 (9.5%) eyes showed progression of the glaucoma during follow up. Presenting visual acuity was ≤ 6/36 in 57 (60%) of affected eyes and ≤ 6/18 in 30 (31.6%) fellow eyes. At final follow up, visual acuity was ≥ 6/12 in 70 (73%) of the affected eyes and 79 (90.8%) of the fellow eyes. 33 (34.7%) eyes had cataract surgery during the follow up period. Causes of poor visual outcome (≤ 6/18) at final follow up included cataract in 14 (42%) eyes, ARMD in 7 (22%) eyes, progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in 4 (13%) eyes, and other causes in 8 (23%) eyes. Conclusions:Over two thirds of eyes treated for acute angle closure glaucoma recovered good central visual acuity. Co–morbidity is a major contributor to poor visual outcome in acute angle closure patients. Patients can be reassured that fellow eye is likely to maintain good vision.

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