May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Intracorneal Keratoprosthesis Implantation Using Femtosecond Laser: A Laboratory Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T.T. Nguyen
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • M.A. Sarayba
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • R.M. Kurtz
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • T.I. Almeda
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • P.M. Sweet
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • R.S. Chuck
    Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T.T. Nguyen, None; M.A. Sarayba, Intralase Corp. C; R.M. Kurtz, Intralase Corp. I; T.I. Almeda, Intralase Corp. C; P.M. Sweet, None; R.S. Chuck, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4615. doi:
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      T.T. Nguyen, M.A. Sarayba, R.M. Kurtz, T.I. Almeda, P.M. Sweet, R.S. Chuck; Intracorneal Keratoprosthesis Implantation Using Femtosecond Laser: A Laboratory Model . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4615.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To demonstrate femtosecond laser–assisted intracorneal keratoprosthesis implantation and determine the mechanical stability as a function of intraocular pressure. Methods: Eight human corneoscleral rims were mounted on an artificial anterior chamber. The femtosecond laser microkeratome was used to create a 2.5 mm–diameter posterior stromal lenticule. A 7.2 mm–diameter stromal pocket was then created at mid–corneal depth. Finally a 6 mm arc opening to the corneal surface was created at the periphery of the lamellar cut. The posterior lenticule was removed using corneal forceps and a 7.0 mm biopolymer keratoprosthesis was inserted into the stromal pocket. The surface wound was sealed using 2 sutures. A 3.5 mm anterior corneal opening was either manually or laser trephined to expose the keratoprosthesis. Intrachamber pressure was raised until wound leak was observed. Results: The femtosecond laser produced precise dissections even at increased corneal depths. The stromal pocket diameter was well–matched to the keratoprosthesis dimensions and resulted in a stable implant. Implantation was simple and effective. All samples withstood pressures of 135 mmHg, the upper limit of the experimental apparatus. Conclusions: : Femtosecond laser corneal dissection provides an alternative to the more challenging manual keratoprosthesis implantation method.

Keywords: keratoprostheses • cornea: clinical science 
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