May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Identification of a novel splice variant of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir7.1 in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. Yang
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences,
    University of Michigan–Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, MI
  • B.A. Hughes
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, and Molecular and Integrative Physiology,
    University of Michigan–Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D. Yang, None; B.A. Hughes, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grants EY08850 and EY07003, Foundation Fighting Blindness, and RPB Lew R. Wasserman Award (BAH)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4717. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D. Yang, B.A. Hughes; Identification of a novel splice variant of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir7.1 in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4717.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: We have shown previously that the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir7.1 is highly expressed in the RPE, where it functions in K+ secretion and setting the membrane potential. Using conventional RT–PCR, we detected transcripts for several members of the Kir gene family in human RPE. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alternative splice variants for Kir7.1 might be expressed in human RPE and assess the relative abundance of Kir channel subunits. Methods: Native human RPE was freshly dissociated from donor eyes. RT–PCR was used to detect the expression of Kir7.1 and potential splice variants. The abundance of Kir channel subunits was determined by quantitative RT–PCR. Results: Using conventional RT–PCR analysis, we found a new transcript in native human RPE similar to Kir7.1 that is predicted to encode a truncated protein. We designate this new transcript as short form of Kir7.1, or Kir7.1S. We detected Kir7.1S transcript in native human neural retina, kidney, and brain as well as monkey RPE and neural retina. Quantitative RT–PCR analysis shows that in the human RPE, both Kir7.1 and Kir7.1S levels are significantly greater than other Kir channel subunits (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). The expression sequence of Kir channel subunits was Kir7.1 > Kir7.1S >> Kir3.4 > Kir2.1 > Kir2.2 > Kir6.1 > Kir3.1 > Kir4.2 > Kir1.1. Conclusions: We hypothesize that Kir7.1S could affect the expression of Kir7.1 protein and/or Kir7.1 channel function by a dominant–negative mechanism, thus impacting RPE physiology.

Keywords: retinal pigment epithelium • gene/expression • ion channels 
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