May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Are BAK–free antibiotics susceptible to bacterial contamination?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T.L. Kaiura
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • D.C. Ritterband
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • M.K. Shah
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • M.K. Rhee
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • J.A. Seedor
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T.L. Kaiura, None; D.C. Ritterband, None; M.K. Shah, None; M.K. Rhee, None; J.A. Seedor, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4912. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      T.L. Kaiura, D.C. Ritterband, M.K. Shah, M.K. Rhee, J.A. Seedor; Are BAK–free antibiotics susceptible to bacterial contamination? . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4912.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine the incidence of microbial contamination of antibiotics bottles used postoperatively. Methods: 100 bottles of gatifloxacin with 0.005% BAK (Zymar®) and 100 bottles of moxifloxacin without BAK (Vigamox®) were collected. Each patient had been instructed to use the drops at an every four–hour rate for one week following intraocular surgery. Seven drops from each bottle and a swab of the tip of each bottle were inoculated into separate thioglycolate broth tubes (BBL) and incubated for 7 days 37°C. If turbidity (growth) was observed, isolates were sub–cultured and identified by standard methods. Results: No microbial growth was noted from the contents of any of the bottles tested. The tip of one bottle of moxifloxacin was positive for coagulase negative staphylococcus. No gatifloxacin bottle tips were positive for microbial growth. Conclusions: Microbial contamination of antibiotic drops used postoperatively is rare and does not appear to be affected by the presence of BAK as a preservative.

Keywords: antibiotics/antifungals/antiparasitics • cataract • microbial pathogenesis: clinical studies 
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