December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
Gap Junction Coupling between Cone Bipolars and AII Amacrine Cells
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • EB Trexler
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center Houston TX
  • W Li
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center Houston TX
  • SC Massey
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center Houston TX
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   E.B. Trexler, None; W. Li, None; S.C. Massey, None. Grant Identification: Support: NIH Grants EY13664, EY10608, and EY06515, and RPB
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 1943. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      EB Trexler, W Li, SC Massey; Gap Junction Coupling between Cone Bipolars and AII Amacrine Cells . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):1943. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Gap junctions couple homologous cell types, forming lateral networks of neurons that synapse with vertical processing units in both the outer and inner plexiform layers of the retina. In addition, gap junctions couple heterologous cell types such as AII amacrine cells (AIIs) and on-center cone bipolars (CBs). Functional coupling of AIIs to each other and CBs to AIIs is known to be important for scotopic vision. Recent studies in light adapted retinas suggest that AII-CB junctions may also operate under photopic conditions. However, little is known about the electrical conductance and gating properties of AII-CB gap junctions. Methods: Using two patch electrodes, we recorded from pairs of AIIs and CBs in light-adapted rabbit retina. Stable whole cell patch recordings were obtained on each cell in the pair, and each cell was held at -40 or -60 mV. Voltage pulses were applied to one cell in the pair, and junctional currents were measured in the opposite cell. Results: Gap junction coupling varied in conductance from ∼50 to more than 600 pS. In some pairs, it appeared that the instantaneous junctional conductance rectified, with conductance greatest when the AII was depolarized relative to the CB. Single channel gating events were not evident, suggesting a small single channel conductance. Conductance decreased over a period of minutes, suggesting that dialysis with the pipette solution removes factors necessary for normal operation. Conclusion: These experiments demonstrate that a direct electrical connection exists between AII amacrine cells and ON cone bipolars. Furthermore, the gap junctions between AIIs and CBs are open under light-adapted conditions and allow bi-directional electrical signaling between the two cell types.

Keywords: 416 gap junctions/coupling • 330 bipolar cells • 312 amacrine cells 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×