July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Visual acuity assessment in children obtained using a novel cell phone application compared to the clinical examination in a pediatric ophthalmology clinic
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lloyd Zhao
    School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Sandra Stinnett
    Duke University Department of Ophthalmology, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Sasapin Grace Prakalapakorn
    Duke University Department of Ophthalmology, Durham, North Carolina, United States
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 183. doi:
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      Lloyd Zhao, Sandra Stinnett, Sasapin Grace Prakalapakorn; Visual acuity assessment in children obtained using a novel cell phone application compared to the clinical examination in a pediatric ophthalmology clinic. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):183.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Peek Acuity (Peek Vision Ltd., Surrey, England) is a smartphone-based application that assesses visual acuity (VA) using a standardized algorithm and does not require a verbal response from the test subject. The application has been shown to correlate well with VA assessments in adults but has not been studied in children. Our primary aim is to compare VA assessment between that obtained by Peek Acuity and the pediatric ophthalmology clinical examination, the reference standard.

Methods : In this ongoing prospective study, we assessed VA in children (aged 3 to 17 years) seen in the pediatric ophthalmology clinic by two methods: 1) Peek Acuity and 2) standard clinical examination methods (Allen pictures and HOTV in younger children, Snellen in older children). We randomized the order of VA assessment and tested VA for each eye. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to compare VA assessment between the two methods for each eye. SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC) was used for all statistical analysis.

Results : We enrolled 97 children aged 3-17 years. ICC between Peek Acuity and clinic VA assessment was 0.91 (95% Confidence interval (CI), 0.87-0.94) for right and 0.86 (95%CI, 0.79-0.90) for left eyes. By age groups: ICC was 0.75 (95%CI, 0.47-0.90) for right and 0.47 (95%CI, 0.04-0.75) for left eyes among 3-4 year olds (y/o) (n=19); 0.93 (95%CI, 0.89-0.96) for right and 0.89 (95%CI, 0.82-0.94) for left eyes among 5-10 y/o (n=53); and 0.79 (95%CI, 0.58-0.90) for right and 0.78 (95%CI, 0.57-0.90) for left eyes among 11-17 y/o (n=25).

Conclusions : Among children 3-17 y/o, Peek Acuity assessment of VA demonstrated overall excellent correlation with the standard clinical examination in the pediatric ophthalmology office. When stratified by age groups, 5-10 y/o had excellent correlation between the two methods, 11-17 y/o had good correlation, and 3-4 y/o had fair to good correlation. Peek Acuity thereby may serve a role as an accessible and reliable VA assessment tool for primary and secondary school-aged children.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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