July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Improvements to manual registration of AOSLO image sequences
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dirk-Uwe G Bartsch
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Manuel Amador
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Amit Meshi
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Kunny C Dans
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Tiezhu Lin
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • William R Freeman
    Ophthalmology-Shiley Eye Ctr, Univ of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Dirk-Uwe Bartsch, None; Manuel Amador, None; Amit Meshi, None; Kunny Dans, None; Tiezhu Lin, None; William Freeman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported in part by UCSD Vision Research Center Core Grant P30EY022589, NIH grant EY016323 (DUB) and an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, NY (WRF)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 660. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Dirk-Uwe G Bartsch, Manuel Amador, Amit Meshi, Kunny C Dans, Tiezhu Lin, William R Freeman; Improvements to manual registration of AOSLO image sequences. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):660.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) records line-by-line video sequences that are subject to motion artifacts. Strip alignment cross-correlation has been the procedure of choice to correct for eye motion. The procedure requires human interaction in finding a reference frame. We are investigating the use of automated cross-correlation to located a suitable reference frame. We also investigated the influence of strip width and strip spacing on the success of the strip alignment cross-correlation.

Methods : AOSLO video sequences were recorded with our custom-built instrument using the design by Dubra [Dubra Biomedical Optics Express (2011)]. Images were exported to a workstation with nVidia multicore graphics card running Matlab and NIH ImageJ. We used a set of 50 video sequences taken from the AOSLO. We used automated cross-correlation algorithm (ACCA) (StackReg plugin to NIH ImageJ) to analyze the correlation between subsequent frames. The maximum ACCA was used a screening tool to increase the detection speed of the optimal reference frame for strip alignment. We compared the result of NIH ImageJ plugin to the decision by a trained operator. For the strip width evaluation we varied the strip width between 8 and 40 pixel in steps of 8. For the strip spacing evaluation we varied the spacing between 8 and 40 pixel in steps of 8.

Results : We found that ACCA increased the speed by finding good candidates for a toggle view by a human operator. The strip width and spacing variation had little influence on the resulting size of the image. The most important variable was image quality of the video sequence.

Conclusions : AOSLO is limited in its clinical application by the low yield and long post-acquisition processing time. , it is estimated that for every hour of imaging between 10-20 hours of processing is needed. This severely limited the ability of clinicians to use AOSLO imaging on a routine basis. The high-resolution of the instrument limits the field-of-view. The small field-of-view entails that a large number of images have to acquired to yield a reasonable mosaic of overlapping individual images. In addition, light safely limits the quality of a single frame making it necessary to acquire a series of sequential frames at the same location. Continued advances in image processing and hardware motion correction are required to transform the operation of AOSLO imaging into a routine clinical device.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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