July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Microbial Contamination in Corneas Stored in Organ Culture Media: A 30 Month Report from the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meidong Zhu
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Save Sight Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Matthew Wells
    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Morgan Kennedy
    Save Sight Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Rajnesh Devasahayam
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Pierre Georges
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mona Ghabcha
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jane Treloggen
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Gerard Sutton
    Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Con Petsoglou
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank , New South Wales Organ and Tissue Donation Service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Save Sight Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Meidong Zhu, None; Matthew Wells, None; Morgan Kennedy, None; Rajnesh Devasahayam, None; Pierre Georges, None; Mona Ghabcha, None; Jane Treloggen, None; Gerard Sutton, None; Con Petsoglou, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 907. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Meidong Zhu, Matthew Wells, Morgan Kennedy, Rajnesh Devasahayam, Pierre Georges, Mona Ghabcha, Jane Treloggen, Gerard Sutton, Con Petsoglou; Microbial Contamination in Corneas Stored in Organ Culture Media: A 30 Month Report from the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):907.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Microbial contamination is one of the major factors causing corneal tissue loss in Eye Banking. The purposes of this study were to assess corneal tissue in organ culture that resulted in positive microbiology and to analyse the major factors that may relate to the contamination.

Methods : Data from the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank (LNSWEB) between the 1st of September 2011 and the 30th of April 2014 prior to the introduction of eye bank corneal pre-preparation protocol were reviewed retrospectively. All corneas were stored in organ culture storage media (OCS) using standard protocol. Eyes were decontaminated with 5% povidone iodine for 5 minutes. At day 3, 3 ml of OCS was inoculated in a pair of Bactec Plus Aerobic/F and Bactec Lytic/10 Anaerobic/F culture bottles and placed in a Bactec 9240 incubator for 5 days at 37°C. This test was repeated 1 day after the tissue was transferred into organ culture transport medium (OCT). The corneas were divided into positive and negative groups according to both OCS and OCT culture results. For each demographic factor including age, gender, time from death to enucleation, time to preservation and tissue collecting season was analysed between the two groups. An odds ratio and an overall p value considering all possible comparisons of each subgroup was generated for each factor.

Results : A total of 1708 corneas were included in the analysis with a total of 47 cases of microbial contamination, representing a contamination rate of 2.75%. Female showed higher contamination rate than male donors (odds ratio=2.28; p=0.0111). The main contaminants were Candida species followed with Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus. Tissues collected in summer and autumn had high contamination rate (odds ratio=1.56 and 1.84 respectively, p=0.03). Rates of contamination varied from 0 to 12.5% for all institutions with a trend to high contamination rates from remote institutions. Age, time from death to enucleation and time to preservation had no correlation with microbial contamination.

Conclusions : A contamination rate of 2.75% is in the low range compared to reported data from other Eye Banks and represents the laboratory protocols and donor selection criteria utilised by the dedicated staff at the LNSWEB. With Candida species contributing the largest percentage of contamination, specific measures to combat fungal contamination should be considered.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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