July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
SCOPE study: Comparing severity of dry eye symptoms in keratoconus patients using corneal gas permeable lenses versus scleral lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen Shorter
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Jennifer S Harthan
    Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Amy Nau
    Korb and Associates, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Jennifer Swingle Fogt
    The Ohio State University , Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Muriel Schornack
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Dingcai Cao
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Cherie B Nau
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ellen Shorter, None; Jennifer Harthan, Metro (C), Shire (C), Valeant (C); Amy Nau, None; Jennifer Fogt, Alcon (F), Allergan (F), Contamac (F), Shire (F), Shire (C), Valeant (C); Muriel Schornack, None; Dingcai Cao, None; Cherie Nau, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  The National Keratoconus Foundation, Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 1775. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ellen Shorter, Jennifer S Harthan, Amy Nau, Jennifer Swingle Fogt, Muriel Schornack, Dingcai Cao, Cherie B Nau; SCOPE study: Comparing severity of dry eye symptoms in keratoconus patients using corneal gas permeable lenses versus scleral lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):1775.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To compare severity of dry eye symptoms and visual consequences between patients with keratoconus using corneal gas permeable lenses and those using scleral lenses.

Methods : An online survey developed by the Scleral Lens in Ophthalmic Practice an Evaluation (SCOPE) study group was distributed by the National Keratoconus Foundation between October 2016 and March 2017. Respondents self-reported their keratoconus diagnosis and completed the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) that included 12-items to assess dry-eye related symptoms and their impact on functional vision experienced during the last week. In OSDI, participants rated each item on a scale of 0 to 4, with 0 for “none of the time”, 1 for “some of the time”, 2 for “half of the time”, 3 for “most of the time” and 4 for “all of the time”. The data were compared between lens types either by t-tests or chi-square tests first, followed by multivariate analysis controlling for age at diagnosis and number of years living with keratoconus.

Results : 422 participants completed the survey. There were 76 individuals using scleral lenses in both eyes (age at survey completion: 48(mean)±14(SD); age at diagnosis: 28±11 years). There were 75 participants using corneal gas permeable lenses in both eyes (age at survey completion: 52±14 years; age at diagnosis: 25±9 years). The overall OSDI severity score was significantly higher in individuals using corneal gas permeable lenses than using scleral lenses (44.0(mean)±2.7(sem) vs. 35.3±2.4, p < 0.05 from t-test or multivariate analysis controlling age of diagnosis or years living with keratoconus. Specifically, compared to scleral lens wearers, gas permeable lens wearers reported higher rating of feeling gritty (p = 0.02), feeling uncomfortable in windy conditions (p<0.001) and areas with low humidity (p<0.01).

Conclusions : Individuals with keratoconus who use gas permeable corneal lenses report more dry eye symptoms than those using scleral lenses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×